2014 Events


GIS Day@KU
Wednesday, November 19, 8:30 am-4:45 pm

Kansas Union, Alderson Auditorium
GIS Day @ KU is part of a nationwide event to promote awareness of geographic information systems (GIS), and how we use this evolving tool to analyze our world. We continue our tradition of bringing together a community of GIS users from academia, business and government. The 2014 symposium will also include an information fair with vendors from academia and local business that will run throughout the day. As always, GIS Day @ KU is FREE and open to the public. Please register so we can plan for ample refreshments and provide pre-printed name tags. http://www.gis.ku.edu/gisday/2014/. Organized by GIS@KU.

 

Global Food For Thought:
Do Good Fences Make Good Neighbors? State Border Characteristics and the Transnational Flow of Terrorist Violence
Wednesday, November 19, 12:00 pm

Bailey 318
Join Nazli Avdan, KU professor in Political Science to learn more about terrorism. Until recently scholarship on borders has lacked systematic study of border management strategies. We redress this lacuna by leveraging a unique dataset on border barriers introduced in the 20th century. Specifically, we evaluate the effectiveness of fences as a defense against transnational terrorist attacks. While much of the literature on transnational terrorism has focused on variables such as democracy, development, and distance that are difficult for policy makers to manipulate, this analysis suggests that fencing may represent an effective policy tool for leaders to insulate their states from transnational terrorist attacks. A light lunch will be provided.Earn credit for GAP.


The Sun is Not So Central
Wednesday, November 12, 4:00 pm

Spencer Museum of Art, Reception Room
Photographer, calligrapher, and book artist, Michael Cherney (Chinese name Qiu Mai) shares his practice of merging modern photography and Chinese classical painting. Born in New York, Cherney has lived and traveled in China for the past 20 years. Samples of his work may be viewed during the talk, and his exhibition Stone and Mist: Chinese Landscape Photography is on view at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art through February 1, 2015.
Sponsored by the Center for Global & International Studies, Center for East Asian Studies, Department of East Asian Languages & Literatures, Kress Foundation Department of Art History, Department of Visual Art, and Spencer Museum of Art. Earn credit for GAP.


The Ebola Outbreak in Wider Perspective: Social Scientists Discuss Health, the State, and Society in Africa
Wednesday, November 12, 3:30-5:00 pm

Kansas Union, Malott Room
Ebenezer Obadare, Glenn Adams, Sandra Gray
Social science experts in sociology, psychology, and anthropology share their views on the Ebola outbreak and its implications during this panel discussion. The panel is co-sponsored by the Kansas African Studies Center, the Center for Global & International Studies, the Department of African and African-American Studies, the Department of Anthropology, the Department of Psychology, and the Department of Sociology. Earn credit for GAP.


Ujamaa Food For Thought:
You Must be God's Servant: Medical Missionaries, Colonialism and Biomedicine in Uganda and Kenya
Wednesday, November 12, 12:00 pm

Bailey 318
Hannington Ochwada, Visiting Lecturer in African History, Departments of History and African & African-American Studies, University of Kansas. Co-sponsored by the Kansas African Studies Center and the Center for Global & International Studies. Free lunch provided.Earn credit for GAP.


Taking Stock: 25 Years Since the Collapse of the Wall
Tuesday November 11, 12:00-1:00 pm

Bailey 318
KU History Professor, Nathaniel Wood, will share his perspective on how the fall of the Berlin wall has shaped Eastern Europe over the past 25 years. This lecture is part of the regularly scheduled CREES Brownbag Lecture Series. Sponsored by the Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies, Ermal Garinger Academic Resource Center, Department of Germanic Languages & Literatures, European Studies, Spencer Museum of Art, Global Awareness Program, Center for Global & International Studies, and Jayhawks Without Borders International Studies Club. Earn credit for GAP.

 


Film: Goodbye Lenin!
Sunday November 9, 2:00-4:00 pm

Spencer Museum of Art Auditorium
This weekend marks the 25th anniversary of the Fall of the Wall. Join us for a screening of Goodbye Lenin!, a coming-of-age adventure that blends the fall of Communism with the salient emotions of a family's love. In 1989, Christiane Kerner has lost her husband and is completely devoted to the Socialist East German state. A heart attack leaves her in a coma, and when she awakens eight months later, the Berlin Wall has fallen and it's a whole new world. To protect her from the shock, her son Alex hatches a plan to keep her in the dark. It's easy... all he has to do is turn back the hands of time. Sponsored by the Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies, Ermal Garinger Academic Resource Center, Department of Germanic Languages & Literatures, European Studies, Spencer Museum of Art, Global Awareness Program, Center for Global & International Studies, and Jayhawks Without Borders International Studies Club. Earn credit for GAP.


Partible Paternity in South America: Societies Where a Child Can Have Multiple Biological Fathers
Thursday, November 6, 4:00-5:00 pm

Burge Union, Gridiron Room
There are many societies in which it is believed that a child is made up of repeated doses of semen, growing somewhat like a pearl throughout gestation. This belief allows for the possibility that a child can have multiple biological fathers. Most of these partible paternity societies are found in lowland South America, although the belief also appears sporadically on other continents. Recent work in South America has shown that children with multiple fathers may have certain advantages in life. Stephen Beckerman is a retired cultural anthropologist who has taught at Southern Methodist University, the Pennsylvania State University (where he is now emeritus) the Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, and the University of Utah (where he is currently an Adjunct Professor). He has conducted fieldwork with tribal peoples in South America over the last four decades. His most recent book, co-authored with Roberto Lizarralde, is The Ecology of the Barí, Rainforest Horticulturalists of South America. Sponsored by South Asian Studies, Department of Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies, Department of Anthropology, Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies. Earn credit for GAP.


Critical Language Scholarships (CLS) Application Workshop
For Arabic, Hindi, Russian, Turkish, Chinese, Persian (Farsi), Japanese, Korean
Thursday, November 6, 1:00-3:00 pm

318 Bailey Hall
This intensive workshop will be led by Anne Wallen, Assistant Director, National Scholarships and Fellowships with the University Honors Program. The workshop is intended to help students applying for CLS for the 2015 term who have already begun their application essays. You must bring a completed draft of your essay to the session. This opportunity is open to all KU undergraduate students intending to apply for CLS for the upcoming cycle (not only honors students). Registration is required. Please email Anne Wallen to reserve your seat at the workshop annewallen@ku.edu.


¡Vamos! Spanish Language Film Festival: Xingu
Wednesday, November 5, 5:30 pm

Spencer Museum of Art Auditorium
This festival brings contemporary international films to Lawrence; celebrating the vibrant film cultures of Chile, Mexico, Costa Rica, and Brazil. This month-long film festival will explore the history we live, the stories we share and the world we create. For the full schedule, see http://film.ku.edu/. Xingu (2012) is based on a true story. During their exploration of central Brazil in 1943, the Villas-Bôas  brothers encounter the Xingu Indians, and devote their lives to preserving Xingu culture. Join us for refreshments and a post-screening discussion with Dr. Luciano Tosta, professor of Spanish & Portuguese, University of Kansas. Sponsored by Film and Media Studies, Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies, Center for Global & International Studies, the Ermal Garinger Academic Resource Center (EGARC), School of Business, Spencer Museum of Art, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Indigenous Studies, Latin American Graduate Organization, and Centro Hispano as our community collaborators. The Spanish Film Club series was made possible with the support of Pragda, and with the additional contribution of Spain Arts & Culture. FREE. Earn credit for GAP.


World Wednesday: A Day in the Life of a Ugandan School Child
Wednesday, November 5, 4:00-5:00 pm

Lawrence Public Library, Meeting Room B
The International Studies Centers at the University of Kansas are pleased to offer local educators a new way to bring global competencies into the classroom at all grade levels and across all curriculum areas. On designated Wednesdays throughout the 2014-15 academic school year, FREE one-hour, hands-on lessons on language and culture from different world areas will be offered at the new Lawrence Public Library. Each session will be taught by an expert in the field and will be designed to provide the know-how needed to turn around and teach the material to students. Sessions will include handouts, interactive activities, and more! This session will explore the similarities and differences between a school day in the US and a school day in Uganda. Learn more about the educational system in Uganda and how to use the shared school experience as a bridge to understanding children in another part of the world. This session will be presented by Mackenzie Jones, KASC Outreach Coordinator.


Nationalism and the Myth of Turkic-Muslim Unity in Central Asia
November 4, 12:00 pm

318 Bailey
Dr. Zanca is professor of anthropology at Northeastern Illinois University. He is co-editor with Jeff Sahadeo of Everyday Life in Central Asia and is the author most recently of Life in a Muslim Uzbek Village: Cotton Farming after Communism. He has conducted research on the political economy of collective farming in Central Asia, and has written on other topics relating to gender, nationalism, religion, and post-Soviet identity. The lecture is sponsored by the Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies, Center for Global & International Studies, and the Department of Geography. Earn credit for GAP.


October 2014
 


Ujaama Food for Thought: Listen, Plan, Educate, Propel Uganda
Wednesday, October 29, 12:00 pm

318 Bailey Hall, 12:00-1:00 pm
Mickey Woolard, a KU School of Education alum, founded Propel Educational Consulting after spending more than 30 years in classroom education and school administration. The vision of Propel is to ignite passionate and productive education among teachers, community members, and volunteers and inspire quality learning among all children and young adults. Propel currently works with teachers, orphanages, non-profit organizations and start-ups in the U.S., Uganda and is exploring expansion to Ethiopia. Mickey’s talk will specifically discuss Propel’s work in Uganda, and serve as a call to the KU community to be involved in future trips. Mickey is particularly interested in having students from all fields of study join Propel’s trips to Uganda, because he sees the value of having different types of people with different backgrounds and strengths involved in the project. Co-sponsored by the Kansas African Studies Center and the Center for Global and International Studies. Free lunch provided. Earn credit for GAP


¡Vamos! Spanish Language Film Festival: The Death of Pinochet/La Muerte de Pinochet
Followed by a
Q & A with the Film’s Director, Ivan Osnovikoff
Monday, October 20, 1:30 pm
Oldfather Studios, Room 120
This festival brings contemporary international films to Lawrence; celebrating the vibrant film cultures of Chile, Mexico, Costa Rica, and Brazil. This month-long film festival will explore the history we live, the stories we share and the world we create. For the full schedule, see http://film.ku.edu/. In The Death of Pinochet (2011), Bettina Perut and Ivan Osnovikoff use original footage and the testimonies of four characters who lived through that day, to relate the end of a key chapter in Chile’s history. A work that balances tragedy and comedy, it is a surprising portrait of Chilean society. Sponsored by Film and Media Studies, Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies, Center for Global & International Studies, the Ermal Garinger Academic Resource Center (EGARC), School of Business, Spencer Museum of Art, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Indigenous Studies, Latin American Graduate Organization, and Centro Hispano as our community collaborators. The Spanish Film Club series was made possible with the support of Pragda, and with the additional contribution of Spain Arts & Culture. FREE. Earn credit for GAP


Conflict in Ukraine: Media Coverage in Russia, Ukraine, and the United States
Friday, October 17, 12:00-1:00 pm
Bailey 318
Panel discussion:
The Ukrainian Perspective, Alex Tsiovkh, REES Professor of Ukrainian Studies
US Media Coverage and the Ukraine Crisis, Bart Redford, CREES Assistant Director
Events in Ukraine: Russian Media Perspective, Raymond Finch, CREES Fellow
Sponsored by the Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies and Center for Global & International Studies. Earn credit for GAP.

 

Interorganizational Collaboration: Shouldn’t This Be Easier Than It Sounds?
Wednesday, October 15, 6:00-7:00 pm
150 Regnier Hall, KU Edwards Campus, Overland Park, KS

Homeland security. Economic growth. Environmental concerns. Population health. These issues and more call for organizations to work together, forming interorganizational col¬laborations (IOCs) to solve problems across for-profit, non-profit, and NGO lines. It makes sense that a variety of organizations with different expertise and resources should be able to work together. However, this work is not as easy as it might appear. We will discuss the role of these collaborations, examples, and brief strategies for influencing the potential success of these IOCs. Presented by Dr. Debra Ford, Research Assistant Professor, KU Medical Center. This event is free and open to the public.

 

 

¡Vamos! Spanish Language Film Festival: Even the Rain/También la Lluvia
Wednesday, October 15, 5:30 pm (Join us for free tamales at 5:00 pm)
Spencer Museum of Art Auditorium

This festival brings contemporary international films to Lawrence; celebrating the vibrant film cultures of Chile, Mexico, Costa Rica, and Brazil. This month-long film festival will explore the history we live, the stories we share and the world we create. For the full schedule, see http://film.ku.edu/.  Even the Rain (2010). This masterful film-within-a-film raises questions about exploitation in South America, blurring the lines between past and present, fiction and reality. Join us for tamales before the screening and a post-screening discussion with Dr. Bart Dean, professor of Anthropology, University of Kansas. Sponsored by Film and Media Studies, Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies, Center for Global & International Studies, the Ermal Garinger Academic Resource Center (EGARC), School of Business, Spencer Museum of Art, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Indigenous Studies, Latin American Graduate Organization, and Centro Hispano as our community collaborators. The Spanish Film Club series was made possible with the support of Pragda, and with the additional contribution of Spain Arts & Culture. FREE. Earn credit for GAP.

 

Media and Military: A Tentative Alliance
Monday, October 13, 5:30 pm
Watkins
Museum
Join us for this free panel discussion about the relationship between our military and media. This discussion will focus on the sometimes difficult and definitely complex relationship between the media and the military. Panelists include:

  • Cast members of Basetrack, a multimedia theatrical experience addressing war, community and family, taking place at the Lied Center on October 15 at 7:30 pm.
  • Barbara Barnett, Associate Dean of KU’s School of Journalism
  • Folleh Tamba, Veteran Artist
  • Michael Price, KU adjunct and former BBC reporter who embedded with British and American troops
  • COL Steve Boylan (US Army, Ret), Assistant Professor of the Army's Command and General Staff College who served as Strategic Communication Officer for the Commander, Multi-National Force-Iraq and the US Central Command Transition Team where he was responsible for the public affairs mission in Iraq. 

The discussion will be moderated by Mike Denning, Director of KU’s Office of Graduate Military Programs. There will be a post discussion reception at the VFW. This event is sponsored by the Lied Center, KU’s Office of Graduate Military Programs, and the European Studies Program. This event is part of the KU Centennial Commemoration of WWI, coordinated by the European Studies Program. The Commemoration aims to explore how WWI can inform our understanding of contemporary conflicts and how contemporary conflicts can inform our understanding of WWI. Learn more at http://european.ku.edu/wwi-tribute and KUWWI.com.

 

Reading: Poetry of the First World War with Guest Artist Folleh Tamba and KU Students
Wednesday, October 8, 4:00 pm
Spencer Museum of Art, Central Court

Artist and U.S. Marine veteran of Iraq and Afghanistan, Folleh Tamba discusses his work and how it is influenced by poetry written in response to the First World War. KU students join Folleh in reading poems from that era and share how they resonate today. Tamba’s artwork is a combination of sculpture, poetry, and photography. It draws viewers in so that they experience the viscera of combat through visual and audio documentation, as well as tangible artifacts. The goal is to place us inside the subconscious of a combat veteran before, during, and after his repeated deployments. Tamba’s exhibition, “A Grunt’s War Diary,” is currently on display at the Kansas State University. Sponsored by the European Studies Program, Lied Center of Kansas, and the Spencer Museum of Art. This reading is part of the KU Centennial Commemoration of World War I, coordinated by the European Studies Program. Learn more about participating units and upcoming programs at http://european.ku.edu/wwi-tribute and KUWWI.com.
 

 

Persian Film: Sokout
Tuesday, October 7, 7:00-9:00pm
Bailey 318

The film Sokout (The Silence, 1997, Mohsen Makhmalbaf) tells the story of Khorshid, a little blind boy who lives with his mom in a house near a river somewhere in Tajikistan. The landlord comes around every morning to ask for the rent. Khorshid has to provide the money or else they'll have to leave. His blindness has given him an amazing skill in tuning musical instruments, which gets him a job at an instrument repair shop. But Khorshid is constantly mesmerized by music; whenever he hears a great musician play, he loses track of time and place. Because of this, he always gets lost and gets to work late. How is he going to balance between his love of music and his task as a breadwinner? Shown in Tajik Persian with English subtitles. Sponsored by the Persian Club and Middle East Studies Program. Free and open to the public. Earn credit for GAP.  

 

SPICMACAY: Indian Classical Music and Dance

Sunday, October 5, 12:30-2:15 pm

Kansas Union, Woodruff Auditorium
 

Acknowledged by connoisseurs as a solo dancer of repute and a creative choreographer of rare caliber, Prerana Deshpande is among the leading solo dancers of her generation in Kathak, the traditional classical dance form of north India.  Prerana started learning Kathak from an early age in India and today is internationally acclaimed as a creative dancer whose work reveals the perpetually expanding horizons of the traditional form.  She is renowned for her exquisite command over the fundamentals of Kathak - rhythm, grace, and expression and for her creativity.

Greatly appreciated by all audiences for her expertise in Kathak, she is the recipient of numerous awards and is regularly invited to perform as a solo artist at all major venues and festivals in India and abroad. By introducing classical arts forms from India, SPICMACAY events aim to inspire, educate and thrill students and public during their interactive events.  SPICMACAY is run purely by student volunteers, in over 300 chapters in schools, colleges and universities worldwide.  All events are always free and interactive. Co-sponsored by SPICMACAY and South Asian Studies. Earn credit for GAP.
 
 

International Expo
October 1, 10:00am-4:00pm
4th Floor, Kansas Union

Representatives from international offices and organizations will be available to talk to students about the international opportunities on campus.
 


September 2014

Global Food For Thought: The Politics of Tribes in Jordanian Elections
Thursday, September 25, 12:30 pm
Bailey 318

Gail Buttorff, Assistant Professor of Political Science, will examine the role of tribes in the electoral process in Jordan. In particular, she will discuss the socio-economic changes and governmental actions that have resulted in the increased fragmentation of tribes. The lack of coordination between and among Jordanian tribes is one source for the large number of candidates competing for each seat in Jordanian parliamentary elections. A light lunch will be served. FREE. Earn credit for GAP.

 

Middle East Lecture Series: Dynamics of Change
Is there a 'Middle East'? The Strange History of a Term and its Implications
Friday, September 26, 7:30 pm

Burge Union, Gridiron Room

Unlike "South America," there is no geographical underlay to what we call "The Middle East."  Since most Muslims live elsewhere, it isn't even strongly demarcated by culture.  What is the origin and history of the term?  What does it tell us about power/knowledge in geopolitics today?

Juan Cole is a professor at the University of Michigan, commentator on the Middle East, and founder of the weblog, Informed Comment http://www.juancole.com/. Cole is author of The New Arabs: How the Millennial Generation is Changing the Middle East (2014) and Engaging the Muslim World (2009). Both books will be available for sale at the lecture. Presented by the KU Middle East Studies Program & KU Honors Program. Co-sponsored by Center for Global & International Studies, Department of Religious Studies, Department of Political Science, Hall Center for the Humanities, Department of History, Department of Geography, KU Students for Justice in the Middle East, Arab Student Union, Jayhawks Without Borders. Earn credit for GAP.

 

 

April 2014

Canaanites, Philistines, and others at Tell es-Safi/Gath - The Hometown of Biblical Goliath
Tuesday, April 22, 4:00-5:30 pm
Kansas Union, Pine Room

 

Jhalak 2014: Talent Show & Reception
Saturday, April 19, 3:00 pm reception & 4:00 pm show
Lawrence Arts Center

Jayhawk Jhalak is an annual talent show that KU SASA hosts every year to showcase various South Asian acts. There will be various classical, Bollywood, and fusion dancing as well as classical and western styled musical performances! Both the reception and show are FREE. Sponsored by KU South Asian Student Association, South Asian Studies Program, Student Senate, and Center for Global and International Studies. Approved for GAP credit.

 

Global Food For Thought: Tale of Two Tolbiacs:  Paris-Dakar and Thirdspace
Thursday, April 17, 12:00 pm
Bailey 318
Van Kelly, Associate Professor,
French
Literary cityspace is, or at least can be, what geographer Edward Soja calls « real-and-imagined space »--Thirdspace, with « its strategic flexibility in dealing with multiple forms of oppression and inequality » (Thirdspace, p. 13). The talk, replete with visuals, will mindwalk the audience through two highly contrastive cityscapes, Paris (the Thirteenth Arrondissement with an emphasis on the social past and present of Rue de Tolbiac, its primary artery) and Dakar (with a focus on the Plateau Arrondissement and especially the environs around the Lébou enclave of Tolbiac, also known as Raïl, Parka, Roukhoudjinné). The literary angle on these quarters will come from Léo Malet and Jacques Tardi’s graphic detective novel, Fog on Tolbiac Bridge, and from brief allusion to a set of Senegalese novels ranging from the political to the social (Cheikh Hamidou Kane, Ousmane Sembène, Boubacar Boris Diop,  and Ken Bugul, each creating his/her own suspense and Thirdspace). Free lunch of spiced chickpea stew and rice will be served.  Approved for GAP Credit.

 

Explore the Musical Heritage of the Turkish Black Sea with Aysenur Kolivar
Thursday, April 17, 7:30 pm
Lied Center

Enjoy a musical journey of the Anatolian Black Sea with Ayşenur Kolivar and her three-piece ensemble. Kolivar is one of Turkey’s most highly-regarded recording artists and composers. Her double CD of Black Sea songs titled Bahceye Hanimeli, "Honeysuckle for the Garden," was released in 2012 to critical acclaim and her work is featured on the soundtracks of prominent Turkish films. Kolivar is a soloist and researcher with the Helesa Project, which collects and performs folk music from the Black Sea. She also teaches Turkish language and is a Ph.D. candidate in musicology and music theory at Istanbul Technical University, where she researches the East Black Sea with an emphasis on women’s culture. For more information, please visit http://lied.ku.edu/events/kolivar.shtml

FREE Pre-performance Discussion
Discovering Turkey’s Rich Culture
Thursday, April 17, 6:30-7:15 pm
Lied Center Pavilion

With Mike Wuthrich, Assistant Director, Center for Global & International Studies and Esra Predolac, Lecturer in Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies


 

Lawrence in Arabia
Wednesday, April 16, 6:00-8:00 pm
Gridiron Room, Burge Union

Come celebrate a night of Arab culture with KU Arab Student Union! The night will feature contemporary Arabic pop music, live traditional Arabic music performances on Oud and Tablah, Dabke dance performances, delicious Arabic food from local Lebanese Flower1, and a decorative henna tattoo and calligraphy station. A rare opportunity to immerse yourself in Arab celebratory culture, you won’t want to miss!

 


March 2014

Yoga and the Spiritual Basis of Equality
Monday, March 24, 11:00 am-12:30 pm
Burge Union, Courtside Room

Howard Resnick, PhD, Sanskrit and Indian Studies, Harvard University
India has recently emerged from nine hundred years of domination by foreign cultures—Islamic and European. What was India like when its own original culture dominated the land? The equality of all people, in terms of rights and dignity before the law, forms the foundation of contemporary social and political philosophy. What can the ancient Indian civilization teach us today as we strive to construct a just, free, and healthy world? In the most important ancient text of yoga philosophy, Krishna states that “yoga is defined as equality” [Bhagwat Gita 2.48]. How is this ancient concept of universal spiritual equality relevant today? Can it help us address contemporary problems? What is the basis of this ancient notion of equality? Dr. Howard Resnick, also called Hridayananda Dasa Goswami, is a well-respected scholar, writer, and a practitioner with the Hare Krishna community. Sponsored by South Asian Studies, Center for Global & International Studies, KU South Asian Student Association. Approved for GAP credit.

 

Syria graphic

Syria In Crisis: Jayhawk Awareness Week
Monday, March 24-Wednesday, March 26

The civil war in Syria continues to violently wage on, killing thousands of innocent people, and dispossessing millions more from their homeland. The death toll, which has accumulated since the Assad regime met the peaceful civilian uprising in 2011 with violence, has exceeded 140,000. The first step to helping the Syrian people is educating ourselves and raising awareness throughout our communities. We have three primary events planned.

  • Monday, March 24: Ask about Syria. Ask a member of KU SJME about the humanitarian situation in Syria, and receive a ribbon to show your support. On the 4th floor of the Kansas Union, all day.
  • Tuesday, March 25: Saving Syria’s Children, BBC documentary screening, Alderson Auditorium, Kansas Union, 4:00 pm
  • Wednesday, March 26: Catered Dinner and Lecture. Ecumenical Campus Ministries, 6:30-9:00 pm.

Join us for a Middle Eastern fundraising dinner. Each plate costs $15 and all proceeds will support a food package organized and distributed to Syrian victims by Syria Relief and Development (SRD). This will be followed by a speech by Syrian activist and former KU alumni Jomana Qaddour regarding the humanitarian situation in Syria, free of charge to the public. To purchase tickets please visit our secure link.

Sponsored by the Honors Program, Political Science Department, Jayhawkers, the Panhellenic Council, Arab Student Union and the Center for Global and International Studies. Approved for GAP credit.

 

Literature, Intellectuals and Politics in Post-War Germany: The Impact of the Gruppe 47 on the Development of German Democracy
Tuesday, March 25, 7:00 pm
Max Kade Center (Sudler House)

Per Øhrgaard, Professor Emeritus, Copenhagen Business School, Department of Business and Politics
Max Kade Distinguished Visiting Professor
In postwar West Germany, the intellectuals and writers associated with Group 47, led by Hans Werner Richter, wanted to play a role in establishing democracy. Historians sometimes claim that they overestimated their possibilities and impact, but without confidence in their self-appointed task, they might not have made the effort. This lecture will try to sketch a picture of the intellectual climate in which democracy emerged in postwar Germany.
Sponsored by Department of Germanic Languages & Literatures, European Studies Program, Max Kade Foundation. Approved for GAP credit.

 

Global Food For Thought
Migration and “Illegality” in Tangier
Wednesday, March 26, 12:00 pm
Bailey 318

Majid Hannoum, Associate Professor, Socio-Cultural Anthropology
Since early 1990s, Tangiers had become the main gate for undocumented migration to Europe. However, by early 2000s, when the European Union openly declared its “war against illegal immigration,” what used to be the space of (documented and undocumented) human flows in this North African city, had been transformed into a space where African migrants are stuck—unable to cross and yet unable to come back home. This lecture will address the everyday life of the African migrants in Tangier, and shed light on the dynamics of border crossing in the southern Mediterranean. The lecture is an examination of their resilience in the face of both draconian measures of the European Union, which is determined to block them, as well as the diplomatic obligation of Morocco which is “mandated” by the European Union to either deport or keep them. In short, the lecture addresses one of the most somber aspects of globalization—the sequestration of unwanted migration. Free lunch of spiced chickpea stew and rice will be served. Approved for GAP Credit.

 

Andries Fourie
Friday, March 28, 1:30 pm
Kansas Union, Alderson Auditorium

Andries Fourie is Salem-based artist, teacher and curator. A native of South Africa, he has an MA in Art from California State University, Sacramento, and a Masters of Fine Art from The University of California, Davis. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Art and Art History at Willamette University in Salem, Oregon. His work and research deal with the intersection of art, culture and identity in a South African context, and he has lectured, exhibited and conducted workshops in South Africa, Canada, Namibia, Kenya, and the United States. He is primarily a mixed-media sculptor, who includes elements of painting, installation, performance and printmaking in his work. Sponsored by the Center for Global & International Studies, Kansas African Studies Center, African and African-American Studies, Spencer Museum of Art. Approved for GAP credit.

 

Ahmed Mater: An Artist's Perspective of Arabia
Sunday, March 9, 1:00 pm
Spencer Museum of Art Auditorium

Ahmed Mater lives and works in Abha, Saudi Arabia. His work has drawn international attention, being collected by the likes of the British Museum and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. His interdisciplinary art, encompassing photography, calligraphy, painting, installation, performance and video, explores the narratives and aesthetics of Islamic culture in an era of rampant globalization, consumerism and transformation. His art is informed by his daily life as a medical doctor in Abha as well as by his traditional upbringing in Saudi Arabia. His recent work delves into unofficial histories of Saudi sociopolitical life. It is concerned with the representation of traumatic events of collective historical dimensions, and the ways in which video and photography can document physical and psychological violence, that accompanies the accelerated transformation of a historically and traditionally rich place. Co-sponsored by KU Saudi Student Association, Spencer Museum of Art, KU Middle East Studies Program, Center for Global & International Studies, Department of Religious Studies, School of Architecture, Planning and Design, Department of African & African American Studies, Kansas African Studies Center. Approved for GAP credit.

 

Visiting International Military Officers Open Forums
Friday, March 7, 1:30-3:00 pm

On Friday, March 7th, the University of Kansas will host regional open discussion panels featuring military officers from Afghanistan, Australia, Bangladesh, Botswana, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Czech Republic, Chile, Colombia, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Israel, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Korea, Kuwait, Lithuania, Malaysia, Mexico, Morocco, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Poland, Qatar, Romania, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Sweden, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey and the United Arab Emirates. The purpose of the panels is to discuss regionally specific political and military issues of interest to KU students, faculty and staff. These officers are among 42 international officers attending the U.S. Air War College at Maxwell Air Force Base in Montgomery, Alabama.

The open forums and their locations are listed below. The event is free and open to the public.
East Asia: Japan, Korea, Taiwan | 1:30 p.m. 204 Bailey Hall
Africa: Botswana, Morocco, Nigeria | 1:30 p.m. 315 Strong Hall
Western/Central Europe: Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Norway, Sweden, UK | 1:30 p.m. 3659 Wescoe
Eastern Europe: Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Finland, Lithuania, Poland, Romania | 1:30 p.m. 318 Bailey
Latin America: Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico | 1:30 p.m. 315 Bailey Hall
Middle East: Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, UAE | 1:30 p.m. 330 Strong Hall
South Asia: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan | 1:30 p.m. Spencer Research Library, Johnson Room
SE Asia/Oceania: Australia, Indonesia, Malaysia, New Zealand, Singapore, Thailand | 1:30 p.m. 3134 Wescoe

 

Persian Culture Festival: The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, A Dramatic Reading
Tuesday, March 4, 6:30-8:00 pm
Kansas Union, Hawk’s Nest

Omar Khayyam’s “Rubaiyat,” particularly Edward Fitzgerald’s 1859 translation, is one of the most recognized and quoted works of Persian poetry in the English-speaking world. Join us for a rare chance to experience the beauty and potency of both that famous English translation and the music of the poems in the original Persian (Farsi) language. KU Persian Language and Iranian Studies Lecturer, Razi Ahmad, will give a brief introduction to the life and work of Omar Khayyam. KU Professor of Classics, Stanley Lombardo will read the English translation of the poems. Dr. Lombardo is widely known for his poetic translations of ancient classical works such as the Iliad and the Odyssey and his enthralling live readings of such works. Hamideh Gerami and Habib Arjmand will recite the poems in Farsi and will be accompanied by Afshar Jalilzadeh on the Tar (traditional Persian lute.) Sponsored by the KU Persian Club, Center for Global & International Studies, KU Middle East Studies Program, Spencer Museum of Art, the KU Commons, Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies. Approved for GAP credit.

 

Persian Culture Festival: Traditional Persian Music Concert
Thursday, March 6, 6:30-8:00 pm
The Commons at Spooner Hall

Kansas City Iranian musical group, Orkideh, will present a selection of traditional Persian music. Sponsored by the KU Persian Club, Center for Global & International Studies, KU Middle East Studies Program, Spencer Museum of Art, the KU Commons, Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies. Approved for GAP credit.

 

Words in Alternative Locations: “Jongos” and the Shift from Folklorism to Cultural History in Brazil
Tuesday, March 4, 4:00 pm
Wescoe 4012

Pedro Meira Monteiro, Professor of Spanish and Portuguese Languages and Cultures, Princeton University
In the late 1940s, following the path opened by American ethnologist Melville Herskovitz, historian Stanley Stein recorded former slaves in Brazil’s Paraíba Valley singing “jongos.” Just a few years earlier in that country, one could still find poet Mário de Andrade working on the recovering of popular culture through the collection of songs and careful listening to the “cantadores.” It seems that the 1940s were a time of an important shift from Folklorism to Cultural History. The goal of this presentation is to help understand how the cultural-historical perspective comes about, and how Mário de Andrade and Stanley Stein can be seen as two researchers who, though listening to similar aural material, develop different ways of approaching “culture” and its “popular” expression. Finally, the presentation aims at understanding how the veiled meaning of words in “jongos” may have induced the historian to establish a particularly complex standpoint from which to see and listen to the world the slaves made. Prof. Monteiro's talk will be based on his recent book " Cangoma Calling: Spirits and Rhythms of Freedom in Brazilian Jongo Slavery Songs." Sponsored by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, and the Center for Global & International Studies. Approved for GAP credit.

 

Nation-Building in Turkey as Reflected in the Literature of the Gallipoli Campaign (KU)
Monday, March 3, 4:30-5:30 pm
Kansas Union, Kansas Room

Ayşe Candan Kirişci, PhD, Department of Western Languages and Literatures, Bogazici University, 2011
The defense at Gallipoli (1915) has been of major significance in Turkish history. The event has been the subject of a large number of writings, from historical accounts to personal narratives. Literary works have also fed the public imagination. Since the actual battles, Gallipoli has been celebrated as a moment of pride. At times it has been viewed as a victory reminiscent of the past Ottoman glory. More important has been recognition that Gallipoli was a turning point that helped reinforce a burgeoning Turkish identity. The representation of Gallipoli in Turkish literature has been marked by varying intensity and emphases that reflect the phases undergone by the nationalist current. This presentation will give an overview of this journey. The lecture is part of the University of Kansas centennial commemoration of World War I, coordinated by the European Studies Program. Learn more about participating units and upcoming programs. Sponsored by the European Studies Program, the Center for Global & International Studies, and the Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies. Approved for GAP credit.

 

From Köprü (Bridge) to Merkez (Center): Turkey’s Regional and Global Impact
Annual Security Conference Program
Monday March 3, 8:00 am-4:00 pm
Kansas Union, Alderson Auditorium

For schedule and more details, contact crees@ku.edu . This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.Sponsored by the Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies, the Center for Global & International Studies, and Middle East Studies at the University of Kansas, together with the Foreign Military Studies Office (FMSO) at Ft. Leavenworth, KS. It is funded by a US Army Research grant.

 

Persian Culture Festival: Persian Calligraphy Workshop
Saturday, March 1, 1:30-3:30 pm
Kansas Union, Alcove G

A workshop to learn about the exquisite art of Persian calligraphy. Watch a demonstration of traditional techniques by an expert calligrapher and learn the basics of writing Persian script. Participants will complete a calligraphy project that they can take home. No previous experience necessary. Space is limited and registration is required. Please email jirving@ku.edu to register. Sponsored by the KU Persian Club, Center for Global & International Studies, KU Middle East Studies Program, Spencer Museum of Art, the KU Commons, Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies. Approved for GAP credit.


February 2014

The Clue in the Lake: Tulsidas and the Sufis of Avadh
Friday, February 28, 3:00 pm
108 Smith Hall

Dr. Philip Lutgendorf, Professor of Hindi and Modern Indian Studies, University of Iowa
When the poet-saint Tulsīdās composed his celebrated retelling of the Rāmāyaṇa, entitled Rāmcaritmānas, in ca. 1574 AD, he created a powerful vehicle for the transmission of Rām-devotion in northern and central India through a literary epic in a pūrbī or “eastern” dialect of (what is now called) Hindi. Although nineteenth and twentieth-century scholars convincingly identified the principal Sanskrit textual sources on which Tulsī evidently drew in constructing his epic, they generally ignored or gave only passing notice to the four long allegorical poems known as prem kahānī or premākhyān (“love stories”), composed between the late fourteenth and mid-sixteenth centuries in the same poetic dialect and verse format, by Muslim authors affiliated with Sufi lineages. Drawing on recent research on the structure and cultural context of these enigmatic poems, especially the work of the late Aditya Behl, this paper argues for their significant influence on the genesis of the famous Hindi epic, and suggests that its composition represented, within an environment of intense sectarian and ideological competition, a Vaishnava and Brahmanical response to the structure, subject matter, and popular appeal of the Sufi narratives.

 

Shattered Hopes: Obama's Failure to Broker Israeli-Palestinian Peace
Thursday, February 27, 6:00 pm
Kansas Union, Big 12 Room

As the White House continues to invest significant political capital trying to broker Israeli-Palestinian peace, nationally-renowned author, speaker and activist Josh Ruebner will discuss his new book Shattered Hopes: Obama’s Failure to Broker Israeli-Palestinian Peace and shed light on why the United States has been unable to achieve success despite more than twenty years of effort. Ruebner is a former Analyst in Middle East Affairs at Congressional Research Service, a nonpartisan federal government agency providing Members of Congress with policy analysis. Ruebner’s analysis and commentary on U.S. policy toward the Middle East appear frequently in media such as NBC, ABC Nightline, CSPAN, Al Jazeera, USA Today, Los Angeles Times, The Hill, Detroit Free Press, Huffington Post, Middle East Report, and more. Foreign Policy in Focus called the book “Accessible and engaging…It’s a biting critique. Having consulted both leaked classified sources and publicly available documents, Ruebner fills Shattered Hopes with an abundance of evidence culled from primary sources, allowing readers to see for themselves the seemingly endless mistakes that characterize the so-called “peace process.’”
Sponsored by KU Students for Justice in the Middle East (SJME) and the Center for Global & International Studies. Approved for GAP credit.

 

International Opportunities Fair "Tour the World!"
Learn How to Study, Work, and Volunteer Abroad
Wednesday, February 26, 3:30-5:30 pm
Kansas Union Lobby

Come visit tables hosted by Returned Peace Corps Volunteers and KU Students and Staff who have studied, worked, and lived abroad. Get connected with KU departments and organizations to start the journey of a lifetime. Be sure to stop by the Taste the World table provided by the Peace Corps. Union Catering has created a spread to send your taste buds on an adventure of their own. Hosted by KU Peace Corps. Co-sponsored by Global Awareness Program (GAP), the Center for Global and International Studies (CGIS), the Kansas African Studies Center (KASC), the Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies (CREES), Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies (CLACS), and the Center for East Asian Studies (CEAS). Approved for GAP credit.

 

WWI Commemoration at KU
Tuesday, February 25, 7:00 pm
Watkins Museum

Lorie Vanchena and Sam Moore
The European Studies Program at the University of Kansas is coordinating the centennial commemoration of World War I (2014-2018). It aims to develop, coordinate, and promote a wide range of programming and educational opportunities that will be of interest and relevance not only to the broader university community but also to the City of Lawrence and the State of Kansas. European Studies is collaborating with a wide range of programs, departments, centers, museums, and organizations on campus and in the region.

Dr. Lorie A. Vanchena, Academic Director of European Studies, and Sam Moore, BA History, will present an overview of events taking place this semester as well as future commemoration plans, including a Twitter reenactment of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand based on the successful re-creation of William Quantrill’s raid on Lawrence (1863) staged last August.

Co-sponsored by the Watkins Museum and European Studies. Approved for GAP Credit.

 

The Messenger in the Old Engravings: Walter Benjamin on Karl Kraus
Monday, February 24, 5:00-6:00 pm
Max Kade Center (Sudler House)

Ariel S. Linden, Visiting Assistant Professor, Germanic Languages & Literatures
The German-Jewish cultural critic and philosopher Walter Benjamin (1892-1940) is often celebrated for his kaleidoscopic approach to modern media and their ur-forms in the nineteenth century. Less acknowledged are the literary portraits Benjamin drew of his own contemporaries. This talk unfolds Benjamins highly ambivalent and politically charged critique of one such figure: the Viennese satirist Karl Kraus (1874-1936). Known chiefly for his scathing satires of the press, which reached their apex during and after the First World War, Kraus was, for Benjamin, one of the few figures who embodied the impulses and contradictions characteristic of his age, both the reactionary and the revolutionary. Sponsored by Germanic Languages & Literatures and European Studies. Approved for GAP credit.

 

The Elephant in the Room. The Story of the Carlsberg Foundation or Why Business Needs the Humanities
Thursday, February 20, 3:30-5:00 pm     
Hall Center for the Humanities, Conference Hall

Per Ohrgaard, Distinguished Visiting KU Max Kade Foundation Professor during the spring 2014 semester is Professor in the Faculty of Languages, Communication and Culture, Copenhagen Business School and also serves on the Board of Directors, Carlsberg Foundation, Copenhagen, Denmark. He will give a talk with discussion on the relationship between humanistic education and the business world. Sponsored by Germanic Languages & Literatures, Hall Center for the Humanities, School of Business, University Honors Program, European Studies, KU Max Kade Center. Approved for GAP Credit.

 

Stripping In War and Peace: Ancient Tactics for Modern Times
Wednesday, February 19, 3:30 pm
Centennial Room, Kansas Union

Omofolabo Ajayi-Soyinka, Professor of Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies, and Theatre
Leyman Gbowee, one of the three winners of Nobel Peace Prize winners in 2011, along with her team of anti-war women in Liberia, provides the basis for exploring the effectiveness of war prevention and peace resolutions in contemporary times. In a comparative discourse between the ancient practice of ‘protest stripping’ in times of conflict by African women, and current peace process and resolutions in contemporary global context, it examines and analyzes African women’s continuing efforts to be a critical and effective force in sustaining peace on the continent – in spite of structural obstacles. Sponsored by the Center for Global & International Studies, Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Theatre, Kansas African Studies Center. Approved for GAP credit.

 

The Arab Uprising Lecture Series
Egypt:  Revolutionary Process or Failed Revolution?
Thursday, February 13, 7:30 pm
Mona El Ghobashy

The Commons in Spooner Hall
Sponsored by KU University Honors Program, Clifford P. Ketzel Speaker Series fund for the Expression of Minority Opinions, the Center for Global and International Studies, the Departments of Sociology, Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies, African and African American Studies, Middle East Studies and the Kansas African Studies Center. Free and open to the public. Approved for GAP credit.

 

Advocacy in Action
Thursday, February 13, 7:00 pm
Woodruff Auditorium, Kansas Union

JD Stier, the manager of Raise Hope for Congo, will speak about his history as a drug rehabilitation facilitator, his experience working for the White House and his current position at the Enough Project. Specifically, Stier will be explaining the importance of volunteering, how it can build to advocacy, and how those elements can lead people to pursue service careers. Followed by a reception in the Jayhawk Room.
Sponsored by KU Alternative Breaks, School of Social Welfare, School of Business and Student Union Activities. For more information go to kualternativebreaks.com, kuabpr@gmail.com or contact Natalie Parker, natparker@ku.edu .

 

Presentation for Global & International Students!
Careers with the U.S. Department of State
Thursday, February 13, 9:00-10:30 am
Woodruff Auditorium, Kansas Union

Jean Preston, Diplomat in Residence, US Department of State
Learn about a career opportunity unlike any other. Discover how you can have a global impact by joining the Foreign Service. Jean Preston, Diplomat in Residence, will share information and answer your questions about internships and career opportunities with the U.S. Department of State.
Take a look at this video! “Changing the World: Joining the Foreign Service" is a video dedicated to showcasing the faces and stories of the amazing men and women who have helped change the world through their careers in the Foreign Service. The film seeks to inspire and prompt people to participate in U.S. diplomacy by joining the Foreign Service.

Ms. Preston joined the State Department in 1986 as a career Foreign Service Officer and has worked overseas and in Washington, DC, with a focus on Latin America, Italy, and Environment, Science, Technology, and Health affairs.  Her most recent assignment was as Counselor for Political and Economic Affairs at the U.S. Embassy in Guatemala.  She currently is assigned as the Diplomat in Residence at the University of Oklahoma, covering a region that includes Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, North and South Dakota, Arkansas, and Missouri

 

Persian Club Film Screening: Children of Heaven (1997, Majid Majidi)
Wednesday, February 12, 7:00 pm
Bailey 318

Join us for the enchanting film by legendary Iranian film maker, Majid Majidi!
The Oscar nominated film Children of Heaven narrates the story of two young siblings. Ali is asked to fetch his little sister Zahra's pink shoes after a cobbler has repaired them. He leaves them unattended to buy some potatoes. While he is pre-occupied, a homeless man picks up the shoes, hidden in a bag, thinking it was garbage and takes them away. Guilt-ridden Ali apologetically offers to share his shoes with her. So Zohra ends up wearing his shoes to morning school, then must race back so that he can put them on to attend afternoon school. To placate her, he even gives her a pen that he received from his teacher after coming first in his class. With the birth of a third child, the family struggles to make ends meet. Their father, who is behind on his rent, does gardening chores, and wants Ali to learn this trade. With the economic situation getting worse, it is only a matter of time when even Ali's shoes will wear out - bringing out the question: what will the children wear to school then? (Source IMDB)

 

Global Food For Thought
Rerooting Berlin's Cultural Landscape: Theatre and Politics, 1945-1946
Wednesday, February 12, 12:30 pm
Bailey 318

Rebecca Rovit, Assistant Professor, Department of Theatre, Department of Germanic Languages & Literatures
Dr. Rovit will address historiographical gaps in postwar German theatre by examining the resurgence of cultural life in Berlin in the immediate wake of WWII. Focusing on the theatre season of 1945-1946, she will examine the continuity of theatre-making by artists who were in the avant-garde during the Weimar republic, while suggesting how an emerging cultural policy in the occupied East sector vs. the West would shape the dramatic repertoire for several years to come. Free lunch of spiced chickpea stew and rice will be served.  Approved for GAP Credit.

 

Sochi Olympics Opening Ceremony Watch Party
Friday, February 7, 6:00-10:00 pm
Traditions Area, Kansas Union

Come one, come all to share in the celebration of global culture and community as we gather to watch the opening ceremonies of the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympic Games! Open to the public, there will be door prizes, a spirit wear contest, games, and refreshment. Come ready for an evening of fun and celebration as we join the world in the celebration of another Olympic Games. Sponsored by KU Center for Global & International Studies, GIST Club, Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies, Office of Multicultural Affairs, Dole Institute, Model UN, KU Polyglot, International Student Association. Approved for GAP credit.

 

Panel: “What’s Going On in Ukraine?”
Thursday, February 6, 1:00-2:00 pm
Alderson Auditorium, KS Union

Panelists include James Marson (Deputy Bureau Chief, Moscow, WSJ), Amy Murphy (REES Alumna, AC Recruiter), Alex Tsiovkh (REES). Sponsored by Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies.

Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship
DEADLINE:  Monday, February 3

Apply for FLAS. FLAS Fellowships cover tuition and provide a stipend for living expenses. FLAS awards are only available for specific languages, and are contingent on federal funding. CGIS offers fellowships for study of: Arabic, Chinese, Farsi, Hindi, Hebrew, Turkish and Uyghur.
Visit FLAS website to apply!
For more info: KU FLAS website


January 2014

Facing Genocide & Its Aftermath
Thursday, January 30, 3:30 pm
Hall Center Seminar Room 1

Please join us to learn more about the impacts of genocide. Two speakers will provide their perspectives.
John Janzen of Anthropology: “Deciphering Images and Voices of War Trauma in Africa's Great Lakes Region”
Nimrod Rosler of the Center for Global & International Studies: “The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: Challenges in the Way to Peace”
Sponsored by the Hall Center for the Humanities.

 

July 1914: Countdown to War
Tuesday, January 28, 7:30 pm
Lied Center Pavilion

The outbreak of the First World War was, as Winston Churchill said, "a drama never surpassed." At the distance of a century, the characters still seem larger than life: Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the brooding heir to the Habsburg throne; a bevy of fanatical Bosnian Serb assassins who plot to murder him while he visits Sarajevo; Conrad and Berchtold, the Austrians who seek to exploit the outrage; Kaiser Wilhelm II and Bethmann Hollweg, who recklessly urge on the Austrians; Sergei Sazonov, Tsarist Russian Foreign Minister, trying to live down a reputation for cowardice; Poincaré and Paléologue, two French statesmen who urge on the Russians and help Sazonov overcome his fears; and not least Churchill himself, who, alone among Cabinet officials in London, perceives the seriousness of the situation in time to take action.

July 1914 tells the story of Europe's countdown to war through the eyes of these men, between the bloody opening act on 28 June 1914 and Britain's final plunge on 4 August, which turned a European conflict into a world war. Some of them mastered events quickly; others fought from behind or rode the whirlwind nearly blind. While there was an element of tragedy in the outcome, it is not really true that, as many popular historians have told us, "no one wanted the war." The outbreak of war in 1914 was no accident of fate. Individual statesmen, pursuing real objectives, conjured up the conflict – in some cases by conscious intention. While some sought honorably to defuse tensions, others all but oozed with malice as they rigged the decks for war. Showing the fearless judgment for which he is known, acclaimed historian Sean McMeekin names names in July 1914, making clear as never before who was responsible for the catastrophe. Co-sponsored by the Hall Center for the Humanities, European Studies, Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies, Germanic Languages & Literatures. Approved for GAP Credit.


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