• Home
  • About
  • Events
  • Global Food For Thought (Lunchtime Lecture Series)

Global Food For Thought (Lunchtime Lecture Series)

Global Food for Thought is a lunchtime lecture series featuring current research from CGIS Faculty. Each one entails a free light lunch and students can earn credit for GAP

 


2015
 


Global Food For Thought
Sustainable Re-housing after Disasters: Learning from Post-tsunami Resettlements in Sri Lanka
International Association of African Educators (IAAE)
Wednesday, September 30, 12:00-1:00 pm
318 Bailey Hall
 

In most post-disaster recovery efforts, particularly in less affluent communities, resettlement housing projects reflect the ideals of the providers (state, donors, and designers) rather than those of the displaced. Join Kapila Silva, Associate Professor, School of Architecture, Design & Planning as he discusses the decisions that architects made when planning and designing resettlement housing projects in Sri Lanka in the wake of tsunami disaster in 2004. He will highlight the key lessons learned from that resettlement project. A light lunch will be served. FREE. Earn credit for GAP. 

Global Food For Thought:
Global Food For Thought: Looking At Dance in the US, India and Malaysia
Wednesday, February 11, 12:00-1:00 pm

Bailey 318
Patrick Suzeau, Professor of Dance, will discuss dance and the observation of movement styles. His presentation will include dances from India and Malaysia as well as the east/west fusion of dance movement. His discussion will touch upon his recent experience as a Fulbright Scholar in Kuala Lumpur. A light lunch will be provided. Earn credit for GAP.

 


2014
 

Global Food For Thought:
Do Good Fences Make Good Neighbors? State Border Characteristics and the Transnational Flow of Terrorist Violence
Wednesday, November 19, 12:00 pm

Bailey 318
Join Nazli Avdan, KU professor in Political Science to learn more about terrorism. Until recently scholarship on borders has lacked systematic study of border management strategies. We redress this lacuna by leveraging a unique dataset on border barriers introduced in the 20th century. Specifically, we evaluate the effectiveness of fences as a defense against transnational terrorist attacks. While much of the literature on transnational terrorism has focused on variables such as democracy, development, and distance that are difficult for policy makers to manipulate, this analysis suggests that fencing may represent an effective policy tool for leaders to insulate their states from transnational terrorist attacks. A light lunch will be provided. Earn credit for GAP.

 

Ujamaa Food For Thought:
You Must be God's Servant: Medical Missionaries, Colonialism and Biomedicine in Uganda and Kenya
Wednesday, November 12, 12:00 pm

Bailey 318
Hannington Ochwada, Visiting Lecturer in African History, Departments of History and African & African-American Studies, University of Kansas. Co-sponsored by the Kansas African Studies Center and the Center for Global & International Studies. Free lunch provided. Earn credit for GAP.

 

Global Food For Thought:
Do Good Fences Make Good Neighbors? State Border Characteristics and the Transnational Flow of Terrorist Violence
Wednesday, November 19, 12:00 pm

Bailey 318
Join Nazli Avdan, KU professor in Political Science to learn more about terrorism. Until recently scholarship on borders has lacked systematic study of border management strategies. We redress this lacuna by leveraging a unique dataset on border barriers introduced in the 20th century. Specifically, we evaluate the effectiveness of fences as a defense against transnational terrorist attacks. While much of the literature on transnational terrorism has focused on variables such as democracy, development, and distance that are difficult for policy makers to manipulate, this analysis suggests that fencing may represent an effective policy tool for leaders to insulate their states from transnational terrorist attacks. A light lunch will be provided. Earn credit for GAP.

 

Ujamaa Food For Thought:
You Must be God's Servant: Medical Missionaries, Colonialism and Biomedicine in Uganda and Kenya
Wednesday, November 12, 12:00 pm

Bailey 318
Hannington Ochwada, Visiting Lecturer in African History, Departments of History and African & African-American Studies, University of Kansas. Co-sponsored by the Kansas African Studies Center and the Center for Global & International Studies. Free lunch provided. Earn credit for GAP.

 

Ujaama Food for Thought: Listen, Plan, Educate, Propel Uganda
Wednesday, October 29, 12:00 pm

318 Bailey Hall, 12:00-1:00 pm
Mickey Woolard, a KU School of Education alum, founded Propel Educational Consulting after spending more than 30 years in classroom education and school administration. The vision of Propel is to ignite passionate and productive education among teachers, community members, and volunteers and inspire quality learning among all children and young adults. Propel currently works with teachers, orphanages, non-profit organizations and start-ups in the U.S., Uganda and is exploring expansion to Ethiopia. Mickey’s talk will specifically discuss Propel’s work in Uganda, and serve as a call to the KU community to be involved in future trips. Mickey is particularly interested in having students from all fields of study join Propel’s trips to Uganda, because he sees the value of having different types of people with different backgrounds and strengths involved in the project. Co-sponsored by the Kansas African Studies Center and the Center for Global and International Studies. Free lunch provided.

 

Global Food For Thought: The Politics of Tribes in Jordanian Elections
Thursday, September 25, 12:30 pm
Bailey 318

Gail Buttorff, Assistant Professor, Political Science

Gail Buttorff, Assistant Professor of Political Science, will examine the role of tribes in the electoral process in Jordan. In particular, she will discuss the socio-economic changes and governmental actions that have resulted in the increased fragmentation of tribes. The lack of coordination between and among Jordanian tribes is one source for the large number of candidates competing for each seat in Jordanian parliamentary elections.

 

Are Natural Resources An Opportunity Or A Curse For Africa?
Wednesday, April 23
Elizabeth Asiedu, Professor, Department of Economics

There have been new oil discoveries in Sub-Saharan Africa. For example in 2007, there were oil discoveries in 14 countries. What are the implications of an increase in oil production for these poor countries?

 

Migration and “Illegality” in Tangier
Wednesday, March 26
Majid Hannoum, Associate Professor, Socio-Cultural Anthropology

Since early 1990s, Tangiers had become the main gate for undocumented migration to Europe. However, by early 2000s, when the European Union openly declared its “war against illegal immigration,” what used to be the space of (documented and undocumented) human flows in this North African city, had been transformed into a space where African migrants are stuck—unable to cross and yet unable to come back home. This lecture will address the everyday life of the African migrants in Tangier, and shed light on the dynamics of border crossing in the southern Mediterranean. The lecture is an examination of their resilience in the face of both draconian measures of the European Union, which is determined to block them, as well as the diplomatic obligation of Morocco which is “mandated” by the European Union to either deport or keep them. In short, the lecture addresses one of the most somber aspects of globalization—the sequestration of unwanted migration.

 

Rerooting Berlin's Cultural Landscape: Theatre and Politics, 1945-1946
Wednesday, February 12
Rebecca Rovit, Assistant Professor, Department of Theatre, Department of Germanic Languages & Literatures

Dr. Rovit will address historiographical gaps in postwar German theatre by examining the resurgence of cultural life in Berlin in the immediate wake of WWII. Focusing on the theatre season of 1945-1946, she will examine the continuity of theatre-making by artists who were in the avant-garde during the Weimar republic, while suggesting how an emerging cultural policy in the occupied East sector vs. the West would shape the dramatic repertoire for several years to come.

 


2013
 

The Muslim Response to the Pentecostal Surge in Nigeria
Wednesday, November 13
Ebenezer Obadare, Associate Professor of Sociology

Over the past two decades, Pentecostal Christianity has moved into pole position in a competitive religious field across most of Africa. Pentecostalism’s undeniable success has triggered a response from Muslims eager to undo its influence. In this presentation, Dr. Obadare will address two related themes in the Nigerian context. The first is the reasons--social, cultural, theological, global--behind the success of Pentecostal Christianity. Second, he will examine the Nigerian Muslim reaction, focusing on the ways in which Islam is being reorganized in response to Pentecostalism’s obvious explosion.

 

Research and Revolution: My Summer in Egypt
Wednesday, November 20
Jackie Brinton, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies, Coordinator, Middle East Studies Program, CGIS

Brinton planned to conduct research in Egypt this summer. Instead, she experienced a military coup!  She will recount her experiences in Egypt and describe how seeing it firsthand was vastly different from learning about it in the US.

 

A View into the World Health Organization's Efforts to Promote Health and Health Equity
Wednesday, September 4
Professor Stephen Fawcett, Director, Work Group for Community Health and Development, a World Health Organization Collaborating Centre at the University of Kansas

What is the World Health Organization’s approach to promoting health and wellbeing?  This informal presentation will address that question through the lens of KU’s WHO Collaborating Centre for Community Health and Development

 


2012
 

Identifying Missing Girls in Rural China
John Kennedy, Professor of Politcal Science, Center Director, CGIS

In 2010, according to the sixth Chinese census, the sex ratio at birth was 118 males to 100 females.  This is incredibly high compared to the global average at the time that ranges from 103 to 107.  The numbers have prompted many international scholars and journalists to ask; where are the “missing girls” in China?  This talk explores this question using village, county and provincial population data to identify the “missing girls”.  The descriptive statistical and in-depth interview data suggest that many of these unregistered girls exist in Chinese society, but without formal identification cards.

 

Professor John Younger: Raiders of the Lost Arc-and Other Jewish Adventures
Wednesday, November 28
Dr. John Younger, Professor of Classics, and Director of  the Jewish Studies Program

John Younger is a field archaeologist who digs primarily in Greece, but at one point his career took an unexpected turn and he wound up excavating a Jewish-Christian catacomb in southern Italy and an early synagogue (3rd-6th c. CE) in the Galilee that produced a remarkable piece of sculpture that was transported to Jerusalem in a high-speed, midnight jeep-chase.

 

Professor Nimrod Rosler: Leaders in Conflict and Peace Process
Wednesday, November 7
Dr. Nimrod Rosler, Schusterman Visiting Israeli Professor in Israel Studies, Jewish Studies Program, CGIS

What is the role of leaders in changing political contexts? How do they fulfill these roles in different conflicts? Dr. Rosler will answer these questions and present a theory regarding the psycho-social roles of leaders and the way they rhetorically fulfill them in two crucial contexts: intractable conflict and its resolution process. Comparative findings will be presented from the Israeli-Palestinian and Norther-Irish conflicts. Israeli snacks will be served.

 

The Mahabharata Today: Insights from the Great War of Ancient India
Wednesday, October 24
Hamsa Stainton, Assistant Professor Department of Religious Studies, South Asian Studies Program Core Faculty

Dr. Stainton will present a talk covering Mahabharata, one of the great pieces of Indian and world literature, and what it can offer contemporary thinkers and citizens--especially in the middle of an election year.

 

The Curious Case of the Kurds (and Kurdish Nationalism)
Wednesday, February 19
Dr. Michael Wuthrich, Assistant Director, Center for Global and International Studies, is researcher of the societies and politics of Turkey and the Middle East

Teaser: “What’s the deal with the Kurds?” The history of the last century has demonstrated numerous cases of ethnic groups, some rather small, finding a way to carve out for themselves autonomous nation-states from larger, domineering existing states often antagonistic to the idea of secession. Why have the Kurds, a population estimated at 25 million and residing within a relatively coherent territorial region and argued to be the largest ethnicity (or “nation”) without a nation-state, not been able to achieve nation-state success? The talk will discuss this question and the various factors that might explain a phenomenon that seems to be a peculiar puzzle, especially to the outside observer, and highlight several of the intriguing paradoxes that have manifest themselves in the development of Kurdish nationalism, particularly in Turkey where the Kurds are most numerous.

 

Associate Professor Shannon O’Lear: From Microwave Popcorn to Brad Pitt's Carbon Offset Trees in Bhutan: Spatial Scale and Environmental Politics
Wednesday, February 6
Dr. Shannon O’Lear, Associate Director, Center for Global & International Studies and Associate Professor in the Department of Geography

We often understand environmental issues at particular spatial scales -- local, national, global, etc. What about other spatial scales -- such as the body -- and to what extent is it helpful to think of environmental issues as connected or as distinct? In this talk, Dr. O'Lear will discuss how different power interests shape our spatial understanding of certain environmental issues, and she will examine a few examples of familiar (and less familiar) environmental issues to consider why it is helpful to challenge common understanding of these issues. This talk draws from Dr. O’Lear’s book titled, "Environmental Politics: Scale and Power".

 


Quick Links


 

Events
CGIS Postcards from Abroad Podcast
One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
44 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times