2013 Events

Career Talk:  From Jayhawk to Diplomat
Monday, December 9th, 1-2 pm
English Room, Kansas Union

U.S. State Department Foreign Service Officer Cassandra Payton will discuss how she turned her KU degree in Slavic Languages and Literatures (BA 2001) into an international career working for NGOs and Government Agencies.
She will also discuss what sorts of international jobs are available and how you can get them!
Everyone welcome! Refreshments will be served.
Sponsored by: KU Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies, University Career Center, Global Awareness Program (GAP), Center for Global & International Studies

 

Report Back:  Egypt 2013
Wednesday, December 4, 6:00-7:30 pm
Malott, Kansas
Union
Join American-Egyptian Anthropologist, Marwa Ghazali, in discussing the political and social developments in Egypt from early 2013 to the present situation, using photos, videos and interviews collected from her research in Cairo this summer. Marwa Ghazali has conducted fieldwork in Egypt since 2007 and spent the summer conduction research in Egypt during the uprisings and the ousting of former President Morsi.  Her research deals with the examination of the political economy of health in Cairo.  She holds an MA in medical anthropology from KU, and is a PhD candidate in medical anthropology. Co-sponsored by KU Students for Justice in the Middle East, African and African American Studies, Political Science, Kansas African Studies Center and the Center for Global & International Studies. Earn credit for GAP.

 

Thursday, November 21, 6:30 pm
Representatives of the 5 area studies centers will read culturally relevant stories and teach 2-3 words in the corresponding language.

  • Europe:  Marcus Höhne will read “Hansel and Gretel” recorded by the Grimm Brothers and teach some German words.
  • Middle East:  An Iranian graduate student will read “The Rich Man and the Parrot” (Rumi tale) retold by Susan Nadimi and illustrated by Ande Cook.  She will teach some Farsi/Persian words.
  • Russia:  Adrienne Landry will read "The Littlest Matryoshka" by Corinne Demas Bliss. She will teach some Russian words and show examples of real Russian Matryoshka.
  • China:  Hong Zhang will read a book on the Chinese zodiac.
  • East Africa:  Daniel Atkinson will read “Mama Elizabeti” by Stephanie Stuve-Bodeen and illustrated by Christy Hale.  He will teach some Swahili words.

 

The Maternal Playground Under Fire
Narratives of Mothers in the Context of Conflict

Thursday, November 21, 3:30 pm
Jayhawk Room, Kansas Union
Biri Rottenberg-Rosler, PhD
The demanding price that mothers and children have to pay in both sides of the Palestinian/Jewish-Israeli conflict has remained unexplored in a broader context. A mother needs to give birth to her own identity while she is being surrounded by the dialectical voices of her inner world, her family and her social environment. In a time of continuous trauma, the opportunity to think about the psychological aspects of motherhood is absent. This lecture will give voice to this relatively hidden, but tremendously important topic. Rottenberg-Rosler will teach a course on this subject, Mothers and Motherhood in Israeli Literature, in spring of 2014.
Biri Rottenberg-Rosler, PhD, is currently a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Hall Center for the Humanities, and a lecturer in the Jewish Studies program in the University of Kansas. She received her PhD from the Bibliotherapy program at the University of Haifa. Her dissertation dealt with narratives of Israeli mothers and their expression in blogs. Her current research interests include bibliotherapy, narrative, psychoanalysis, gender, literature and internet. Co-sponsored by Jewish Studies Program, Center for Global & International Studies, Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies, Department of Psychology. Earn credit for GAP.

 

Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship Information Session
Wednesday, November 20, 3:30-4:30 pm
Malott Room, Kansas Union
The second open information session for FLAS Fellowships (Foreign Language & Area Studies) is right around the corner! It will be held in the MALOTT ROOM of the Kansas Union. Previous advertisements listed Alderson Auditorium—this is incorrect!  More information about this excellent opportunity can be found in the “What is FLAS?” section below.

WHAT IS FLAS?
Each year, the US Department of Education awards Foreign Language Area Studies (FLAS) funding to Area Studies Centers at KU. FLAS funds are awarded in a competitive process open to graduate and advanced undergraduate students to pursue foreign language and area studies for professional purposes. Students pursue advanced training in modern, less-commonly-taught foreign languages and either area or international studies. The program’s flexibility allows students to pursue their own interests in a variety of disciplines including the humanities, the social sciences, STEM fields, and professional programs. FLAS continues to produce distinguished foreign language and area studies experts whose knowledge enriches government, business, and higher education.

There are two types of FLAS awards: Academic Year and Summer. Most Academic Year FLAS fellowships are used for domestic study at KU, although a semester or full year abroad is also an option. Most Summer FLAS awards are used for study abroad.  However, Summer FLAS can also be used for an on-campus KU language program or an intensive language program at another accredited university in the US. FLAS Fellowships cover tuition and provide a stipend for living expenses. FLAS awards are only available for specific languages, and are contingent on federal funding. CGIS offer fellowships for study of: Arabic, Chinese, Farsi, Hindi, Hebrew, Turkish and Uyghur.

This year we will have special presentations by former FLAS awardees, full details on the amounts of the awards, eligibility, tips for the application process and free refreshments! Please visit the KU FLAS website and like KU FLAS on facebook and follow us on Twitter for updates and information!
FLAS Information Session will be held on Wednesday, November 20, 3:30-4:30 pm in the Malott Room of the Kansas Union.

 

GIS Day @ KU
Wednesday, November 20, 9:00 am-4:30 pm

Alderson Auditorium, Kansas Union
GIS Day @ KU is part of a nationwide event to promote awareness of geographic information systems (GIS), and how we use this evolving tool to analyze our world. We continue our tradition of bringing together a community of GIS users from academia, business and government. The 2013 symposium will also include an information fair with vendors from academia and local business that will run throughout the day. As always, GIS Day @ KU is FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Please register so that refreshments and pre-printed name tags can be provided. For more information about registration and the day’s event, please visit.
Co-sponsored by KU Institute for Policy & Social Research, Bartlett & West, KU Department of Geography, KU Libraries, State of Kansas Data Access and Support Center (DASC), Kansas Biological Survey, KU Center for Global & International Studies, KU Environmental Studies Program, KU Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS), TREKK Design Group, LLC.

 

Global Food For Thought
Research and Revolution: My summer in Egypt
Wednesday, November 20, 12:15 pm

Bailey 318
Jackie Brinton, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies
Brinton planned to conduct research in Egypt this summer. Instead, she experienced a military coup!  She will recount her experiences in Egypt and describe how seeing it firsthand was vastly different from learning about it in the USA. Free lunch of spiced chickpea stew and rice will be served. Earn credit for GAP.

 

Award Winning Student Documentary & Short Fiction Film Screening
Monday &Tuesday, November 18 & 19
Professor Hahne will present documentary & short fiction films made by students at the Zurich University of the Arts (ZHdK), including the Student-Oscar winning short Paraveh.  ZHdK is one of Europe’s largest universities of the arts with a total of over 2500 students.  The ZHdK offers Switzerland’s only professional education in cinema creation.  Student productions consistently win prestigious international film awards.  Professor Hahne will highlight a selection of outstanding films and discuss the ZHdK’s approaches to student filmmaking. Free admission and open to all. Co-sponsored by the School of The Arts, Film & Media Studies, Department of Germanic Languages & Literatures and the European Studies Program.  Earn credit for GAP.

 

GLOBAL FORUM: Stories from the Frontlines of the Syrian Crisis
Monday, November 18, 2:00-3:00 pm

318 Bailey Hall
Syrian doctor, Dr. Seri Bakkar will be meeting with us and sharing his experiences and perspectives on the Syrian Conflict. Dr. Seri Bakkar is Syria Relief and Development (SRD)’s Regional Director overseeing the organization’s operations in Syria, Jordan and Turkey. Dr. Bakkar, a practicing physician with a specialty in anesthesiology, was one of a handful of doctors treating the injured inside Syria when the civil war began in early 2011. After he and his family were forced to flee their home in Homs, he traveled to Jordan where he began treating Syrian refugees. Dr. Bakkar was instrumental in establishing SRD’s Refugee Health and Trauma Center in Amman, Jordan, where Syrian refugees receive advanced medical care free of charge. Dr. Bakkar earned his medical degree from Damascus University in Syria where he also worked in the University’s Cardiovascular Hospital. He currently lives as a refugee in Amman, Jordan with his wife and five children.

 

World Fashion Show
Kansas Union Ballroom

November 13, 7:00 pm
The language of fashion is universal and inspirational. Every culture across the world expresses themselves in some way through what they wear. On November 13, join us in capturing a glimpse of the universal language of fashion here on the KU campus. Cultural organizations from all across KU will contribute models and costumes for a night of food, fun and most of all, FASHION. FREE and open to the public. For more information, call the Programs Box Office at (785) 864-7469. Co-sponsored by Student Union Activities and the Center for Global & International Studies. Earn credit for GAP.

 

Catastrophe 1914
Wednesday, November 13, 7:30 - 9:00 pm

Lied Center Pavilion
Sir Max Hastings, author, journalist, and broadcaster presents Catastrophe 1914.
World War I evokes images of the trenches: grinding, halting battles that sacrificed millions of lives for no territory or visible gain. Yet the first months of the war, from the German invasion of Belgium to the Marne to Ypres, were utterly different, full of advances and retreats, tactical maneuvering, and significant gains and losses. In Catastrophe 1914, Max Hastings recreates this dramatic year, from the diplomatic crisis to the fighting in Belgium and France on the western front, and Serbia and Galicia to the east. He gives vivid accounts of the battles and frank assessments of generals and political leaders, and shows why it was inevitable that the first war among modern industrial nations could not produce a decisive victory, resulting in a war of attrition. Throughout the reader encounters high officials and average soldiers, as well as civilians on the home front, giving a vivid portrait of how a continent became embroiled in a war that would change everything.

Sir Max Hastings is an author, journalist and broadcaster whose work has appeared in every British national newspaper. He now writes regularly for the Daily Mail and Financial Times, of which he is a contributing editor, and reviews books for the Sunday Times and New York Review of Books. He has published twenty-three books, including All Hell Let Loose (2011); Finest Years: Churchill As Warlord 1940-45 (2009); Armageddon: The Battle for Germany 1944-45 (2004) and Nemesis: The Battle for Japan 1944-45 (2007).

This lecture is part of a campus-wide collaboration to commemorate the centennial of the First World War. Look for more events sponsored by the Hall Center, European Studies, other campus units, and community partners over the next four years as KU and the surrounding community explore the war and its impact. Co-sponsored by European Studies and the Hall Center for the Humanities. Earn credit for GAP.

 

Global Food For Thought
The Muslim Response to the Pentecostal Surge in Nigeria

Wednesday, November 13, 12:15 pm
Bailey 318

Ebenezer Obadare, Associate Professor of Sociology
Over the past two decades, Pentecostal Christianity has moved into pole position in a competitive religious field across most of Africa. Pentecostalism’s undeniable success has triggered a response from Muslims eager to undo its influence. In this presentation, Dr. Obadare will address two related themes in the Nigerian context. The first is the reasons--social, cultural, theological, global--behind the success of Pentecostal Christianity. Second, he will examine the Nigerian Muslim reaction, focusing on the ways in which Islam is being reorganized in response to Pentecostalism’s obvious explosion. Free lunch of spiced chickpea stew and rice will be served. Earn credit for GAP.

 

Sexuality and Cultural Change:  The Presentation of Gender and Body in Iranian Cinema
Tuesday, November 12, 5:30 pm
             
Centennial Room, Kansas Union             
Kamran Talattof, Professor of Persian language and literature and Iranian culture, University of Arizona            
Dr. Talattof will discuss Iranian cinema, analyze imbedded cinematic codes and investigate how films are composed. This will foster a better understanding of Iranian society which has experienced agonizing periods of change. The history of film corresponds with how gender is constructed and how sexuality is allowed to be expressed. Analyzing movies from both pre and postrevolutionary periods, Dr. Talattof argues that Iranian cinema has influenced socio-political changes before and after the 1979 Iranian Revolution. In the pre-Revolutionary period, the presentation of females, the female body, and sexuality was linked to western modernity and resulted in a backlash of traditional society. In the postrevolutionary period, the presentation of females and the expression of sexuality came face to face with new Islamic codes of morality, which all filmmakers were forced to respect.

Kamran Talattof (University of Michigan, 1996) is professor of Persian language and literature and Iranian culture at the University of Arizona. In his research, he examines how cultural artifacts are created both within and in response to dominant social conditions, political ideologies, and the dominant discourses of sexuality. Talattof is the author, co-author, or co-editor of numerous books and articles including the recently published awards winning Modernity, Sexuality, and Ideology in Iran: The Life and Legacy of a Popular Female Artist (Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2011). Co-sponsored by Middle East Studies, University Honors Program, Center for Global & International Studies, Iranian Studies Group at KU, Persian Club at KU, Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Film & Media Studies. Earn credit for GAP and Arts Engagement Certificate.
 

The Case of Museums as Safeguards of the Interest of Future Generations
Wednesday, November 6, 5:30-6:30 pm

Spencer Museum of Art Auditorium
Alisa Moldavanova, Assistant Professor of Public Administration. Department of Political Science, Wayne State University in Detroit
Dr. Moldavanova will explore sustainability strategies developed within the arts sector, and how these strategies improve the ability of arts organizations to serve the needs of future generations.  The presentation is based on Moldavanova’s research on art museums, literature, music and performing arts organizations located in seven states. Sponsored by the Spencer Museum of Art, Center for Global & International Studies and Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies.

 

Multicultural Story Time—Persian (Farsi)
Saturday, November 2, 10:30 am

Lawrence Public Library, 700 New Hampshire St.
Bring your children to Multicultural Story Time!
Children of all ages are invited to listen to a story told in both English and Persian (Farsi).  Join us in the story time room of the Lawrence Public Library.

 

Lawrence Bhakti Fest
Saturday, November 2, 9:00 am-10:00 pm

Westside Yoga, 4935 Research Park Way in Lawrence
Bhakti Fest celebrates the Hindu Path of Devotion. Please join us for Kirtan, Yoga and a Veggie Feast. This event will feature 7 Kirtan bands, including Ras Mandala, and 5 Yoga classes.
Cost:  $25-50 sliding scale before the feast and $15-30 sliding scale after 7:00 pm (some work exchanges for free entry are possible; see website)
Co-sponsored by KU South Asian Studies, Community Mercantile, Westside Yoga, Lawrence Old Guard Productions. Earn credit for GAP.

5 Broken Cameras
Wednesday, October 30, 5:30 pm

Spencer Museum of Art Auditorium
Public Screening, followed by a panel discussion with:  Nimrod Rosler, Visiting Professor of Jewish and Peace and Conflict Studies, Marie Brown, Department of History, Sara Jawhari, former KU student from Palestine and former President of Students for Justice in the Middle East at KU. The first-ever Palestinian film to be nominated for best Documentary Feature by A.M.P.A.S®, the critically-acclaimed 5 BROKEN CAMERAS is a deeply personal, first-hand account of life and non-violent resistance in Bil’in, a West Bank village surrounded by Israeli settlements.  Shot by Palestinian farmer Emad Burnat, who bought his first camera in 2005 to record the birth of his youngest son, Gibreel, the film was co-directed by Burnat and Guy Davidi, an Israeli filmmaker. Free and Open to the Public. Co-sponsored by University Honors Program, the Center for Global & International Studies, the Theater Department and the Spencer Museum of Art. Earn credit for GAP.

 

Two-day Sanskrit Workshop for Yoga Teachers and Practitioners
Saturday & Sunday, October 26 & 27

OmTreeShala Yoga Studio: 1405 Massachusetts St, Lawrence
Ms. Ashwini Supur, expert in Sanskrit and full time yoga teacher at Yoga Bharati in the Bay Area, will lead a two-day workshop.  She will introduce Sanskrit language and terms, mantras and shlokas with their meanings.  This workshop will deepen your understanding of the goal of yoga and yoga asanas on and off the mat.
For more information contact: OmTreeShala@gmail.com or gtiwari@ku.edu (785) 841-9642

 

Connect Back to Roots—Learn Spoken Sanskrit
Saturday & Sunday, October 26 & 27, 9:30 am-4:30 pm

13818 S. Hagan St, Olathe
Learn Sanskrit, the divine language, in a fun and interactive weekend workshop! No prior knowledge of Sanskrit is required, but a background in Indian languages helps greatly. At the end of the two day workshop, you will understand simple stories and demonstrate language skills by staging impromptu skits. Learning Sanskrit elevates your consciousness and empowers you to understand the shloks in daily prayers and Vedic scriptures like Srimad Bhagavad Gita. The schedule includes several breaks. Kindly arrange for or bring your own lunch.
Once you have completed the workshop, you are invited to participate in regular Sanskrit audio conference classes taught by a qualified Sanskrit teacher. These occur every weekend for 1.5 hours at no cost.
REGISTER TODAY
Fees:  $30/person, $50/couple, $65 for family of 3 or more.
Contact:  Guru:  913-529-9371  guru.radhakrishnan@stoneriver.com or Sudheshna: 923-206-4215 hslusudhi@gmail.com 

 

Iranian Studies Group at KU
Iranian National Identity: Efforts to Build an Identity on Myths and Lies

Thursday, October 24, 5:30 pm
Bailey
204
Efforts have been made over the past century (under both the Pahlavi regime and the Islamic Republic) to define Iran’s national identity around the axis of nationalist and Islamist ideas. As a consequence of these efforts, historical facts, as in any nationalist narrative, have been distorted and myths created. In this talk, one of KU’s Fulbright Language Teaching Assistants, will discuss the definitions of Iranian national identity and the place of Iranian ethnic and religious minorities in these definitions.
Co-sponsored by Iranian Studies Group at KU, Persian Club at KU, Middle East Studies, Center for Global & International Studies.

 

SPICMACAY@KU
Sunday, October 20, 7:45 pm

Woodruff Auditorium, Kansas Union (free entry; donations appreciated)
The Society for Promotion of Indian Classical Music and Culture Amongst Youth (SPICMACAY@KU) presents a demonstration recital by leading vocalist, Pushkar Lele who is today, one of India’s leading young and sought-after classical vocalists. Disciple of renowned Classical vocalist and nirguna bhajan singer, Shri Kumar Gandharva, Pushkar Lele is a much sought after artist, and performs regularly all over India, the USA, Australia, Belgium, Netherlands, Singapore and UAE for concert tours. 

Pushkar Lele will be accompanied by: 
Shri. Vyasmurti Katti on the Harmonium. Katti was born in a music loving family was initiated into music by his sisters. Vyasmurti Katti is one of the most competent Harmonium players of Indian Classical music. He is the disciple of Pt. Ramachari Bagewadi. He is one of the most sought after Harmonium accompanists and he is presently learning vocal music. 
Sanjay Deshpande on Tabla. Deshpande, an internationally accomplished artist has the honor of being the student of tabla stalwarts of India including Pt. Suresh Talwalkar of Delhi-Farookabad Gharana, Ustad. Allarakha, Shri Yogesh Samsi (Senior disciple of Ustd. Allarakha) and Pt. Vivek Joshi of Delhi-Farookabad Gharana.

Co-sponsored by SPICMACAY@KU, South Asian Studies, Center for Global & International Studies, Multicultural Educational Fund at KU, Cosmos and Chutney. Earn credit for GAP.

 

Sarbojonin Durga Puja (Bengali Fall Festival of India)
Indulge yourself in a seamless fusion of culture, arts and fun during this 3-day festival!

All events take place in the Kansas Union.
Saturday, October 12

  • 9:30 am               Debi Puja or morning communal prayers sung for Goddess Durga, Big 12 & Jayhawk Room
  • 12:30 pm             Pushpanjali or offering of flowers to Durga, Big 12 & Jayhawk Room 
  • 1:00 pm               Special Bengali Lunch at ECM facility
  • 2:30 pm               Cultural program by local artists, Woodruff Auditorium
  • 5:30 pm               Aarti (ritual lighting of candles and singing) by children, Big 12 & Jayhawk Room
  • 6:00 pm               Indian dinner catered by a restaurant in Kansas City, Big 12 & Jayhawk Room 
  • 8:00 pm               Musical performance by renowned Bollywood Singers Samir Date, Woodruff Auditorium, $20 at the door for meals

Co-sponsored by KU’s Office of International Programs, South Asian Studies, and the Center for Global & International Studies. Earn credit for GAP.

 

International Peace & Conflict Film Festival—Presented by KU’s five area studies centers
Wednesday, October 9, 5:00 pm

Spencer Museum of Art Auditorium              

 

NO MAN’S LAND (2001)
Presented by the Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies
Disturbingly funny and shockingly absurd, the futility of war is reduced to its essence in this comedic drama set in the 1990s, during the height of the conflict in Bosnia. Winner of the 2001 Academy Award for Best Foreign Film, No Man’s Land tells the story of two wounded soldiers, a Bosniak and a Serb, who are forced to share a wary trust for one another in a struggle for survival despite their own soldiers and the international community sent to “help” them. (121 min.) The first U.S. Ambassador to Bosnia and Herzegovina, Victor Jackovich, will introduce the film and lead a post-film discussion. Co-sponsors of the International Peace & Conflict Film Festival: The Spencer Museum of Art, KU Honors Program, Ermal Garinger Academic Resource Center (EGARC), European Studies Program, Middle East Studies Program, Kansas Consortium for Teaching about Asia (KCTA) KU Film & Media Studies, Department of Spanish & Portuguese, KU Peace & Conflict Studies Program. Earn credit for GAP and KU Arts Engagement Certificate.

 

Multicultural Story Time
Lawrence Public Library

700 New Hampshire St
Open to children of all ages. We will have stories and songs in both English and a foreign language.
Please join us at 10:30 am in the story time room of the Lawrence Public Library.

October 5            Hindi

October 12          Portuguese

October 19          Kaqchikel Maya (featuring American Sign Language for the English portion)

October 26          Spanish

November 5       Persian (Farsi)

Flute Jugalbandi (duet) Concert
With Maestros Shashank Subramaiyam and Rakesh Chaurasia

Saturday, September 28, 6:00-8:00 pm
Shawnee Mission South High School, 5800 W 107th Street, Overland Park, KS 66207                
Shashank is a Grammy nominated renowned exponent of the Bamboo Flute from India and specializes in Indian Classical Music. He was a child prodigy and began performing from his age of 6 in 1984 and has performed in the top circuit for over 25 years now. He was recently the subject of a BBC World TV  documentary entitled Destination Music. Rakesh is the nephew and child prodigy of flute Maestro Pt. Hariprasad Chaurasia. He is an accomplished musician having recorded with most of the leading stalwarts of the Indian film industry. Rakesh was invited to conclude the twenty-four hour live BBC Radio broadcast celebrating Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth’s Silver Jubilee, reaching audiences worldwide. 
Tickets:  Students and children $10, Regular $ 20 (For discounted tickets $15 please contact geeta.tiwari@gmail.com)

 

Teacher Workshop: Tactile Turkey
Saturday, September 28, 9:00 am-3:30 pm

Malott Room, Kansas Union     
Perfect for K-16 educators, this FREE workshop is intended to increase global competency through the study of Turkish current events, history, architecture, design, art, and music.
Join us for morning lectures by experts from the University of Kansas and Johnson County Community College as they discuss current events in Turkey, as well as the historical context of visual language and geometric symbolism in Turkish architecture and textiles. Participate in a Working Group led by a curriculum specialist on how to create cross-curricular, interdisciplinary lesson plans.  Be treated to a private tour of the Spencer Museum of Art’s Teaching Gallery, and participate in a curriculum activity. 

The workshop will conclude with celebrated Turkish musician and Lied Center Caravanserai artist, Omar Faruk Tekbilek. This world famous musician will introduce traditional Sufi, folk, and contemporary music that celebrates Turkey’s rich cultural and musical heritage. The demonstration and lecture is open to the public, so invite your friends, family & students!  Members of the community are welcome to attend – seats on a first come, first served basis; registration for the concluding event is not required.

This workshop is held in association with the Lied Center’s Caravanserai project, an innovative cultural exchange program made possible by a grant from ArtsMidwest. The Caravanserai project creates new pathways for Americans to experience the diversity of contemporary Muslim art by introducing audiences to exciting and dynamic artists from this region. To learn more, go to:
 www.caravanserai-arts.org

 

Gallery Talk: Art in a Global Context: The Museum Collection Across the Curriculum: Lives of Buddhist Artifacts
Friday, September 27, 12:00-1:00 pm
Gallery 408, Spencer Museum of Art

Dan Stevenson, Professor of Religious Studies
Come view works for the first time, through a new lens, or in a deeper way. KU faculty members from the University's international studies centers discuss works of art from the Spencer Museum's collection and relate themes and ideas to various disciplines across campus. For this session, Professor Daniel Stevenson from Religious Studies will lead a foray into the various ways in which Buddhist images and objects, such as the figure of the Zen patriarch Bodhidharma, found their way into the lives of Buddhist clergy and their institutions, lay faithful, and vernacular culture at large. Sponsored by Center for Global & International Studies, Spencer Museum of Art. Approved for GAP and Arts Engagement Certificate credit.

 

Hall Center Seminar - Facing Genocide and Its Aftermath
Thursday, September 26, 2013, 3:30-5:00 pm
Hall Center Seminar Room

Alberto Giordano, Texas State University in San Marcos
"Cartographies of the Holocaust and Genocide"
Co-sponsored by CGIS, Jewish Studies

 

Coffee @ The Commons with Artist Joachim Schmid
Wednesday, September 25, 1:00 pm
Spooner Hall, The Commons
A conversation with Berlin-based artist Joachim Schmid about making artist's books in the age of the Internet, digital photography, online photo-sharing, and print-on-demand. Audience members are encouraged to familiarize themselves with Schmid's work ahead of time, as the dialogue between artist and audience will comprise the majority of the event. For more information about Schmid's artistic pursuits and examples of his work, see his website.Sponsored by the Department of Design, Department of Germanic Languages & Literatures, Department of Visual Art, the European Studies Program, the Institute for Digital Research in the Humanities, the Center for Global and International Studies, and The Commons. Approved for GAP and Arts Engagement Certificate credit.

 

Ambassador John Limbert
"America & Iran: Endless Enemies?"
Friday, September 20, 3:30 pm  
Kansas Room, Kansas Union
Ambassador John Limbert, is the former Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Iran in the State Department's Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs. He is a veteran U.S. diplomat and a former official at the U.S. Embassy in Tehran, where he was held captive during the Iran hostage crisis. He is the author of several books, including "Negotiating with Iran: Wrestling the Ghosts of History.” Sponsored by Center for Global & International Studies, KU Honors Program, KU Middle East Studies Program, KU Persian Club, Iranian Studies Group at KU. Approved for GAP Credit.

 

International Peace & Conflict Film Festival—Presented by KU’s five area studies centers
Wednesday, September 4, 5:00 pm

Spencer Museum of Art Auditorium

 

CATERPILLAR (2010)
Presented by the Center for East Asian Studies
Caterpillar tells the story of a village woman given the grueling task of looking after (and fulfilling the sexual needs of) her quadruple amputee husband, a Japanese soldier in the Second Sino-Japanese War who has been decreed a “War God” by the Emperor. The film serves as a powerful indictment of Japan’s militaristic, nationalistic past. Explicit sexual content. For mature audiences only. (85 min.) The film will be introduced by KU Associate Professor of Film & Media Studies and CEAS Faculty member, Michael Baskett. Megan Greene, CEAS Director and Associate Professor of History, will lead a brief post-film discussion. Co-sponsors of the International Peace & Conflict Film Festival: The Spencer Museum of Art, KU Honors Program, Ermal Garinger Academic Resource Center (EGARC), European Studies Program, Middle East Studies Program, Kansas Consortium for Teaching about Asia (KCTA) KU Film & Media Studies, Department of Spanish & Portuguese, KU Peace & Conflict Studies Program. Earn credit for GAP and KU Arts Engagement Certificate.

 

International Peace & Conflict Film Festival—Presented by KU’s five area studies centers
Wednesday, September 11, 5:00 pm
Spencer Museum of Art Auditorium
WOODSTOCK IN TIMBUKTU (2013)
Presented by the Kansas African Studies Center
A 2011 music festival in Timbuktu, Mali hosted by the nomadic Tuareg is the subject of this film about efforts to maintain peace in an insecure political environment. The Tuareg, or Kel Tamasheq, as they call themselves, tell of their plight, their fears and their fight to preserve their culture in the face of challenges from fundamentalist Muslims in the region. Alongside great music of the Sahara, the film captures the mesmerizing beauty of Saharan landscapes and the determination of Mali’s people. (80 min.). Professor Yacine Daddi Addoun of African and African-American Studies will lead a brief post-film discussion. Co-sponsors of the International Peace & Conflict Film Festival: The Spencer Museum of Art, KU Honors Program, Ermal Garinger Academic Resource Center (EGARC), European Studies Program, Middle East Studies Program, Kansas Consortium for Teaching about Asia (KCTA) KU Film & Media Studies, Department of Spanish & Portuguese, KU Peace & Conflict Studies Program. Earn credit for GAP and KU Arts Engagement Certificate.

 

International Peace & Conflict Film Festival—Presented by KU’s five area studies centers
Wednesday, September 18, 5:00 pm
Spencer Museum of Art Auditorium

 

THE GREEN WAVE (2010)
Presented by the Center for Global & International Studies and KU Honors Program
A documentary-collage illustrating the dramatic events and feelings of the people behind Iran’s “Green Movement,” during the 2009 Presidential elections. Facebook posts, tweets & internet videos were included in the film composition. Hundreds of real blog entries documented the experiences and thoughts of two young students, whose story runs through the film as the main thread. (90 min.) A brief panel discussion will follow. Panelists include Gail Buttorff, Assistant Professor of Political Science and Ranin Kazemi, Assistant Professor of History, Kansas State University. Co-sponsors of the International Peace & Conflict Film Festival: The Spencer Museum of Art, KU Honors Program, Ermal Garinger Academic Resource Center (EGARC), European Studies Program, Middle East Studies Program, Kansas Consortium for Teaching about Asia (KCTA) KU Film & Media Studies, Department of Spanish & Portuguese, KU Peace & Conflict Studies Program.  Earn credit for GAP and KU Arts Engagement Certificate.

 

Global Food For Thought
A View into the World Health Organization's Efforts to Promote Health and Health Equity
Wednesday, September 4, 12:00 pm

Bailey 318
Professor Stephen Fawcett, Director, Work Group for Community Health and Development, a World Health Organization Collaborating Centre at the University of KansasWhat is the World Health Organization’s approach to promoting health and wellbeing?  This informal presentation will address that question through the lens of KU’s WHO Collaborating Centre for Community Health and Development Free lunch of spiced chickpea stew and rice will be served. Approved for GAP Credit.

Spring 2013


Wednesday, April 24, 12:00 pm

Global Food for Thought
“Out of the Shadows: Identifying Missing Girls in Rural China”

John Kennedy, Professor of Politcal Science, Center Director, CGIS
329 Blake Hall
Free Lunch!

In 2010, according to the sixth Chinese census, the sex ratio at birth was 118 males to 100 females.  This is incredibly high compared to the global average at the time that ranges from 103 to 107.  The numbers have prompted many international scholars and journalists to ask; where are the “missing girls” in China?  This talk explores this question using village, county and provincial population data to identify the “missing girls”.  The descriptive statistical and in-depth interview data suggest that many of these unregistered girls exist in Chinese society, but without formal identification cards. 


Lawrence in Arabia: A Celebration of Arab Culture

Wednesday, April 24, 6:00-8:30 PM
Gridiron Room, Burge Union

Join KU Arab Student Union for a night you won't want to miss!

ASU invites you to join them in a fun filled night of Arab cultural activity. Come listen to Arabic music, enjoy the taste of Arabic food, have your name written in Arabic calligraphy, and decorate your hand with beautiful Middle Eastern henna design. The night will also feature a dabke dance performance choreographed by ASU, a talented Oud (traditional Middle Eastern instrument) player, and a fashion show of traditional Arab dress, unique experiences you'll want to be sure to stick around for!

Observe unique artifacts and handicrafts from a variety of Middle Eastern countries.

Co-sponsored by the Office of Multicultural Affairs, KU Middle East Studies program, and the Center for Global and International Studies.

RSVP to the "Lawrence in Arabia" event page on Facebook


Thursday, April 25, 3:30 - 4:30pm
Concert/Lecture with Cody Case
New Nights in Tunisia: Arab-Andalusian Music, Anouar Brahem, and the Oud

Centennial Room, Kansas Union

Cody Case is Coordinator for the Global Awareness Program in the University of Kansas Office of International Programs.  He obtained his BA and MA degrees in Ethnomusicology from the University of Washington in Seattle, WA, and conducted various research projects in Tunisia, France, Quebec, and Ghana. The presentation will focus on findings from studying music in Tunisia from 2009-2010.   

The presentation will first provide an overview of Arab-Andalusian music in North Africa, with specific attention on the Tunisian form known as the Ma’luf.  Cody will perform a few pieces on the oud, or Arab lute, followed by a discussion on the music of Tunisian oud player and composer, Anouar Brahem.  Since the early 1990s, Brahem has been internationally recognized for his unique compositions and instrumentation that bring together several musical forms including the Ma’luf, Turkish music, Arab music, and American jazz.  His creative, simple melodies and emphasis on improvisation are a few distinguishing characteristics in his compositions.  Brahem’s ten albums on the German ECM label include collaborations with multiple renowned Middle Eastern, American, and European musicians.  The presentation will feature a rare recording of an Anouar Brahem concert from 1985 in Tunis, discuss how his style developed in later albums, and highlight the significance of Brahem’s teacher, the influential Tunisian oud virtuoso, Ali Sriti. 


The Arab Uprisings - A Lecture Series
Part 3--Can Egypt's Constitution Work?

Tuesday, April 9, 7:30 pm
The Commons at Spooner Hall
Dr. Nathan Brown, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at George Washington
University

From Tunisia to Egypt, Yemen, Libya or Syria, civil unrest has shaken the political and social stability of North African and Middle-Eastern countries. Two years into these revolutions, some countries are making strides in establishing a new political order, though not necessarily ones people aspiring for more freedom are necessarily in favor of. To better understand the aftermaths to the upheavals, we are sponsoring a lecture series on the Arab Spring, in the spring 2013.

This series is designed to cast new light on the revolutionary process many Middle-Eastern countries are undergoing, from a diverse perspective including history and popular culture, political science, and media.

Sponsored by University Honors Program, Middle East Studies, Center for Global & International Studies. Approved for GAP Credit.


Persian Culture Fest
April 9 - April 11

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Co-sponsored by the KU Persian Club, Center for Global & International Studies, KU Middle East Studies, Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies, The Spencer Museum of Art, KU Commons.

Persian New Year Celebration (Nowruz)
TUE 4/09
2:00 - 4:00pm
Spencer Museum
Reception Room 

Come celebrate and learn about Nowruz, Iranian New Year (traditionally celebrated during the week of March 21st. ) Learn about how Persian New Year is celebrated in Iran and at least 16 other countries from Armenia to Tajikistan to Uzbekistan. Enjoy free Persian food, view Iranian handicrafts, and cultural items, learn about resources for Persian languages at KU (Farsi and Tajik.)


Film Screening/Panel Discussion: A Separation

WED 4/10
Spencer Museum Auditorium, 5:00 pm

  

(Iranian Film, Winner of the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language film 2012)

“Tense and narratively complex, formally dense and morally challenging... The provocative plot casts a revealing light on contemporary Iranian society,    taking on issues of gender, class, justice and honor as a secular middle-class family in the midst of upheaval winds up in conflict with an impoverished religious one.” -Alissa Simon, Variety

Panel will consist of KU Faculty and members of the Iranian community. Film is in Farsi language with English subtitles.


An Evening of Persian Classical Music

Thursday 4/11
6:30 pm
Spooner Hall
The Commons

 Kansas City-based Classical Persian Musical Group “Orkideh” will perform traditional songs. 

Muscians: Morteza Dastjerdi (Violin) Iman Jokar (Violin) Shahraam Fattaahi (Vocal) Mahyar Jalilzadeh (Tar) Farshd Tavallali (Tonbak)


Wednesday, April 10

Security Conference “China & Russia, the Architects of a New Global Order? Interests, Strategies, and Prospects for Conflict and Cooperation”
Malott Room, Kansas Union

China's military, economic, and political rise and Russia's comeback in regional and global affairs have become, arguably, the most important geopolitical realignments of the last two decades. Many envision that the strategic orientation, opportunities for cooperation, and possible future tensions between Moscow and Beijing could shift the balance of power in international relations and global problem solving. The reasons for the growing importance of Russia and China in global politics are manifold: their size, their military and nuclear potential, their economies, and, most importantly, global ambitions. What is less obvious is how collaborative or competitive the Sino-Russian relations will be and what the implications are for global and regional security, multi-literalism, U.S. foreign policy interests, among many other factors.

The goal of the conference is to describe, examine, and understand how the dynamics of Sino-Russian relations affect or are likely to affect geographical and issue-areas of international relations, and the shifts that have been happening or are likely to happen in global politics.

Sponsored by the combined area and international studies centers at the University of Kansas (East Asian; Russian, East European, and Eurasian; Global and International Studies) together with the Foreign Military Studies Office and the Cultural Knowledge Consortium at Ft. Leavenworth.


Conference

Global Water: Drought, Conservation and Security in the 21st Century

Friday, April 12 and Saturday April 13, 2013
The Commons, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS

Water is one of the most important resources on the planet. From sub-Saharan Africa to the American Midwest, rural and urban communities are attempting to find ways to deal with drought conditions and conserve water. There are a number of diverse ways that local governments work with rural and urban communities to conserve water. At the same time, countries have devised various methods and policies to secure water for national security. Issues related to water cover a wide range of disciplines and approaches -- from the international scale to local villages. This conference will address the various approaches and topics related to water and resolving the technical, social, political and environmental issues associated with the use and sustainability of this precious resource.

Sponsored by the combined area and international studies centers at the University of Kansas: Center for East Asian Studies (CEAS), Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies (CREEES), Center for Global and International Studies (CGIS), Center of Latin American Studies (LAS) and Kansas African Studies Center (KASC), as well as the Environmental Studies Program at KU. 


The Arab Uprisings - A Lecture Series

Part 1—The Syrian Conflict: Anatomy of a Perfect Storm
Thursday, March 28, 7:30 pm
The Commons at Spooner Hall
Dr. Leila Hudson, Associate Professor of Modern Middle East Culture and Political Economy at the University of Arizona

From Tunisia to Egypt, Yemen, Libya or Syria, civil unrest has shaken the political and social stability of North African and Middle-Eastern countries. Two years into these revolutions, some countries are making strides in establishing a new political order, though not necessarily ones people aspiring for more freedom are necessarily in favor of. To better understand the aftermaths to the upheavals, we are sponsoring a lecture series on the Arab Spring, in the spring 2013.

This series is designed to cast new light on the revolutionary process many Middle-Eastern countries are undergoing, from a diverse perspective including history and popular culture, political science, and media.

Sponsored by University Honors Program, Middle East Studies, Center for Global & International Studies. Approved for GAP Credit.

The Arab Uprisings - A Lecture Series
Part 2--From Resistance to Revolution: The Role of Rock, Metal and Hip Hop Music in the Arab Uprisings
Monday, April 2, 7:30 pm
The Commons in Spooner Hall
Dr. Mark LeVine, Professor of History at the University of California Irvine

From Tunisia to Egypt, Yemen, Libya or Syria, civil unrest has shaken the political and social stability of North African and Middle-Eastern countries. Two years into these revolutions, some countries are making strides in establishing a new political order, though not necessarily ones people aspiring for more freedom are necessarily in favor of. To better understand the aftermaths to the upheavals, we are sponsoring a lecture series on the Arab Spring, in the spring 2013.

This series is designed to cast new light on the revolutionary process many Middle-Eastern countries are undergoing, from a diverse perspective including history and popular culture, political science, and media.

Sponsored by University Honors Program, Middle East Studies, Center for Global & International Studies. Approved for GAP Credit.


Indian Classical Instrumental Music lecture/demonstration/concert using Mohan Veena.

Artists: Grammy award winner artist Pandit Vishwa Mohan Bhatt accompanied by Subhen Chatterji on Tabla. 
Date: April 7, 2013, Sunday
Venue: Woodruff Auditorium, Kansas Union,  University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
Time: 6.30-8.30 PM

You, your family and friends are invited to a SPIC-MACAY@KU lecture/demonstration/concert on Sunday, April 7, 2013 by Pandit Vishwa Mohan Bhatt, a Grammy Award Winner. Vishwa Mohan Bhatt is a disciple of Late Pt. Ravi Shankar and creator of Mohan Veena. He is accompanied by a well known percussionist, Subhen Chatterji.
As always the event is free.


Iranian Studies Group
PBS documentary, The Iranian Americans
Tuesday, March 12, 5:15 pm  
329 Blake Hall.  Approved for GAP credit.


The Politicization of Islam: Unveiling the Persons Behind the Deception

Monday, March 4, 7:00 pm
Big 12 Room, Kansas Union


Beats Not Bombs: Sounds for Syria

Saturday, March 2nd, 7:00 pm
Alderson Auditorium, Kansas Union

Students for Justice in the Middle East would like to invite the KU Community to a night of music and understanding. The essence of this event will be educating attendees on the realities of the current situation in Syria through music, spoken word, and discussion. Omar Offendum samples classical Arabic music with his modern, hip-hop influenced art and music. He stresses the importance of awareness of all social justice issues not only domestic but internationally.

Overall, our goal is to provide a night of education and hope.


5 Broken Cameras

A Public Screening and Panel Discussion Hosted by the Lawrence Jewish Community Congregation

Wednesday, February 27th, 7:00 pm

917 Highland Drive, Lawrence

Dr. Nimrod Rosler, Visiting Israel Professor at KU's Jewish Studies Program, will open the evening with a talk about Anger and Hope in the Israeli Palestinian Conflict.

Following this introduction, the film will be screened. 5 Broken Cameras is a Palestinian-Israeli co-production documentary -- a deeply personal, first-hand account of non-violent resistance in Bil’in, a West Bank village against the separation barrier built on the lands of the village. The film is 2013 Academy Awards nominee for best documentary feature. 

After the screening a panel discussion will be conducted with two honorable participants:

·        Nyla R. Branscombe is a Professor of Social Psychology at the University of Kansas. Her research has been focused on basic issues of Intergroup Relations, and particularly how members of low and high status groups cope with threats to their social identity. 

·        Leslie Newman is an attorney focusing on community development in Native American and border communities.  She spent two years living in Jerusalem, from 1988-1990.  While she was there, she worked on a project on conflict resolution at Hebrew University, as well as an Israeli-Palestinian human rights initiative.

The event is co-sponsored by the Jewish Studies Program, Center for Global & International Studies, and The Ermal Garinger Academic Resource Center at the University of Kansas.  Entrance is free of charge. 


Path to Peace: Kosovo-Kansas Web Forum

The International Role in Kosovo
Monday, February 25, 12:00 pm
Malott Room

Drilon Gashi, Senior Researcher/Analyst, D4D Kosovo

How does the US’s influence in Kosovo compare to that of the EU or other countries? In

particular, has the US been effective in supporting democracy in Kosovo and can it do more? These questions will be discussed in a comparative context of the US foreign relations with other states that share similarities with Kosovo.

Sponsored by United States Institute of Peace, Democracy for Development, Center for Russian, East European, & Eurasian Studies, Center for Global & International Studies, Office of International Programs. Approved for GAP Credit.


Iranian Studies Group

Tuesday, February, 26, 5:15 pm
329 Blake Hall

PBS documentary The Iranian Americans

Sponsored by Middle East Studies, Center for Global & International Studies. Approved for GAP Credit.


Global Food for Thought (CGIS Lunchtime Lecture Series)

The Curious Case of the Kurds (and Kurdish Nationalism)
Wednesday, February 6, 12:00 pm
Blake 329

Dr. Michael Wuthrich is the Assistant Director, Center for Global and International Studies and a researcher of the societies and politics of Turkey and the Middle East.

Teaser: “What’s the deal with the Kurds?” The history of the last century has demonstrated numerous cases of ethnic groups, some rather small, finding a way to carve out for themselves autonomous nation-states from larger, domineering existing states often antagonistic to the idea of secession. Why have the Kurds, a population estimated at 25 million and residing within a relatively coherent territorial region and argued to be the largest ethnicity (or “nation”) without a nation-state, not been able to achieve nation-state success? The talk will discuss this question and the various factors that might explain a phenomenon that seems to be a peculiar puzzle, especially to the outside observer, and highlight several of the intriguing paradoxes that have manifest themselves in the development of Kurdish nationalism, particularly in Turkey where the Kurds are most numerous.

Light refreshments will be served. Approved for GAP Credit.


Path to Peace: Kosovo-Kansas Web Forum

Kosovo Today: Part II
Monday, February 18, 12:00 pm
Malott Room

Vjosa Osmani, Kosovo Member of Parliament

Discussion of the current international status of Kosovo and its domestic politics, including inter-ethnic relations and reconciliation efforts. Overview of the plans and challenges for Kosovo’s future.

Sponsored by United States Institute of Peace, Democracy for Development, Center for Russian,

East European, & Eurasian Studies, Center for Global & International Studies, Office of International Programs. Approved for GAP Credit.


Syria: New Voices and Paths Forward

Wednesday, February 20, 2:30 pm
Kansas Room, Kansas Union

Panelists: Dr. Michael Wuthrich, Dr. Elif Andac and Dr. Marie Brown. Moderator: Dr. Jacquelene Brinton

Sponsored by Middle East Studies, Center for Global & International Studies, Arab Student Union, Students for Justice in the Middle East, Muslim Student Association. Approved for GAP Credit.



Global Food for Thought (CGIS Lunchtime Lecture Series)

From Microwave Popcorn to Brad Pitt's Carbon Offset Trees in Bhutan: Spatial Scale and Environmental Politics
Wednesday, February 6, 12:00 pm
Blake 329

Dr. Shannon O’Lear, Associate Director, Center for Global & International Studies and Associate Professor in the Department of Geography

We often understand environmental issues at particular spatial scales -- local, national, global, etc. What about other spatial scales -- such as the body -- and to what extent is it helpful to think of environmental issues as connected or as distinct? In this talk, Dr. O'Lear will discuss how different power interests shape our spatial understanding of certain environmental issues, and she will examine a few examples of familiar (and less familiar) environmental issues to consider why it is helpful to challenge common understanding of these issues. This talk draws from Dr. O’Lear’s book titled, "Environmental Politics: Scale and Power".

Light refreshments will be served. Approved for GAP Credit.


Path to Peace: Kosovo-Kansas Web Forum

Kosovo Today: Part 1
Monday, February 11, 12:00 pm
Jayhawk Room

Oliver Ivanovic, Former State Secretary, Ministry for Kosovo and Metohija, Republic of Serbia

Discussion of the current international status of Kosovo and its domestic politics, including inter-

ethnic relations and reconciliation efforts. Overview of the plans and challenges for Kosovo’s future.

Sponsored by United States Institute of Peace, Democracy for Development, Center for Russian,

East European, & Eurasian Studies, Center for Global & International Studies, Office of International Programs. Approved for GAP Credit.


Global Pride: LGBT Issues from Around the World, a panel discussion by KU Area Studies Centers

Wednesday, February 13, 7:00-9:00 pm
Sabatini Multicultural Center

Moderator: Tami Albin

Sponsored by Center for East Asian Studies, Center for Global & International Studies, Center of Latin American & Caribbean Studies, Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies, Kansas African Studies Center, Lied Center of Kansas. Approved for GAP Credit.


Path to Peace: Kosovo-Kansas Web Forum

Kosovo: Background to a War
Monday, February 4, 12:00 pm
Malott Room

Raymond Finch, Senior Analyst, Foreign Military Studies Office

A brief examination of the history of the region, focusing on the ethnic, religious, social, political

and economic issues that led to the Kosovo War.

Sponsored by United States Institute of Peace, Democracy for Development, Center for Russian,

East European, & Eurasian Studies, Center for Global & International Studies, Office of International Programs. Approved for GAP Credit.


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